monetarist


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Related to monetarist: Keynesian, Monetarist Theory

mon·e·ta·rism

 (mŏn′ĭ-tə-rĭz′əm, mŭn′-)
n.
1. A theory holding that economic variations within a given system, such as changing rates of inflation, are most often caused by increases or decreases in the money supply.
2. A policy that seeks to regulate an economy by altering the domestic money supply, especially by increasing it in a moderate but steady manner.

mon′e·ta·rist adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monetarist - an advocate of the theory that economic fluctuations are caused by increases or decreases in the supply of moneymonetarist - an advocate of the theory that economic fluctuations are caused by increases or decreases in the supply of money
bimetallist - an advocate of bimetallism
economic expert, economist - an expert in the science of economics
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

monetarist

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪst]
A. ADJmonetarista
B. Nmonetarista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

monetarist

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪst] nmonétariste m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

monetarist

nMonetarist(in) m(f)
adjmonetaristisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

monetarist

[ˈmʌnɪtrɪst]
1. adjmonetaristico/a
2. nmonetarista m/f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Our borrowings seem not to conform to both Keynesian and Monetarist views on the subject.
Louis Fed was known as the "Monetarist Fed." Several St.
In the 1970s ship-building was suffering out-of-control unionism versus radical, new lowcost building methods by Japanese shipyards, then the Tories got in and undertook their monetarist experiment which with the early-1980s recession helped wipe out most heavy industries - whose workers' unions, by no coincidence, also funded the Labour Party.
A monetarist cross-check of Powell's macroeconomic analysis, organized around the recent behavior of nominal gross domestic product (NGDP), supports his optimistic outlook and confirms the need for additional but gradual policy tightening.
Likewise, an economist who has been trained in a monetarist-oriented department would tend to interpret a current economic event as per the monetarist frame of thought.
That would require also to look to heterodox economic literature, since it is the failings of markets, at the back of least government regulation (as per the monetarist school of thought-based, and IMF supported policy prescription) but by bringing in some kind of hierarchy (depending on a particular market).
Influenced by these monetarist views, many Central Banks abandoned the goal of creating full employment, and instead switched to 'inflation targeting' as a goal of monetary policy.
Surely it is not beyond the wit of manufacturers to make them biodegradable and solve the problem at source and not make the scenario into another monetarist "green grab".
Despite these stated goals, the authors argue that these programs with their monetarist policies are a continuation of the neoliberal capitalist policies.
The monetarist policies followed by Mrs Thatcher in the 1980s and by subsequent Conservative and Labour governments are primarily responsible.
This was graphically displayed by her worship of the monetarist, free-market ideology of Milton Friedman who advised the murderous dictatorship of Chile's Pinochet.