mongoose

(redirected from mongooses)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to mongooses: Herpestidae

mon·goose

 (mŏng′go͞os′, mŏn′-)
n. pl. mon·goos·es
Any of various carnivorous mammals of the family Herpestidae, native to Asia, Africa, and southern Europe and introduced elsewhere, having a slender agile body and a long tail, and noted for the ability to seize and kill venomous snakes.

[Marathi mangūs, of Dravidian origin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mongoose

(ˈmɒŋˌɡuːs)
n, pl -gooses
(Animals) any small predatory viverrine mammal of the genus Herpestes and related genera, occurring in Africa and from S Europe to SE Asia, typically having a long tail and brindled coat
[C17: from Marathi mangūs, of Dravidian origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mon•goose

(ˈmɒŋˌgus, ˈmɒn-)

n., pl. -goos•es.
any of several Old World genera of slender, ferretlike carnivores, esp. of the genus Herpestes, some species of which are noted for their ability to kill cobras.
[1690–1700; < Marathi mangūs, variant of muṅgūs]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mon·goose

(mŏng′go͞os′)
Any of various mammals of Asia and Africa that resemble weasels and are noted for their ability to kill poisonous snakes such as cobras.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mongoose - agile grizzled Old World viverrinemongoose - agile grizzled Old World viverrine; preys on snakes and rodents
viverrine, viverrine mammal - small cat-like predatory mammals of warmer parts of the Old World
Herpestes nyula, Indian mongoose - keen-sighted viverrine of southern Asia about the size of a ferret; often domesticated
Herpestes ichneumon, ichneumon - northern African mongoose; in ancient times thought to devour crocodile eggs
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
mangustimungo
mongúz
mangusta
mungo
mungo

mongoose

[ˈmɒŋguːs] N (mongooses (pl)) → mangosta f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mongoose

[ˈmɒŋguːs] nmangouste f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

mongoose

n pl <-s> → Mungo m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

mongoose

[ˈmɒŋguːs] nmangusta
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He knew that mongooses in the garden meant death sooner or later for him and his family, but he wanted to get Rikki-tikki off his guard.
Still, the instant's delay brought Rikki-tikki up to her, and as she plunged into the rat-hole where she and Nag used to live, his little white teeth were clenched on her tail, and he went down with her--and very few mongooses, however wise and old they may be, care to follow a cobra into its hole.
Rikki-tikki woke up with a jump, for the mongooses are light sleepers.
He was a mongoose, rather like a little cat in his fur and his tail, but quite like a weasel in his head and his habits.
When he revived, he was lying in the hot sun on the middle of a garden path, very draggled indeed, and a small boy was saying, "Here's a dead mongoose. Let's have a funeral."
It is the hardest thing in the world to frighten a mongoose, because he is eaten up from nose to tail with curiosity.
He sat on all their laps one after the other, because every well-brought-up mongoose always hopes to be a house mongoose some day and have rooms to run about in; and Rikki-tikki's mother (she used to live in the general's house at Segowlee) had carefully told Rikki what to do if ever he came across white men.
He was afraid for the minute, but it is impossible for a mongoose to stay frightened for any length of time, and though Rikki-tikki had never met a live cobra before, his mother had fed him on dead ones, and he knew that all a grown mongoose's business in life was to fight and eat snakes.
He came down almost across her back, and if he had been an old mongoose he would have known that then was the time to break her back with one bite; but he was afraid of the terrible lashing return stroke of the cobra.
Rikki-tikki felt his eyes growing red and hot (when a mongoose's eyes grow red, he is angry), and he sat back on his tail and hind legs like a little kangaroo, and looked all round him, and chattered with rage.
"Do you want something special, or will an ordinary mongoose do?"
When Adam got back to the carriage, carefully carrying the box with the mongoose, Sir Nathaniel said: "Hullo!