monkery

monk·er·y

 (mŭng′kə-rē)
n. pl. monk·er·ies Often Offensive
1. Monastic life or practices.
2. Monks considered as a group.
3. A monastery.

monkery

(ˈmʌŋkərɪ)
n, pl -eries
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) monastic life or practices
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a monastery or monks collectively

monk•er•y

(ˈmʌŋ kə ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
1. the mode of life of monks; monastic life.
[1530–40]

monkery

1. Often Contemptuous. thecustoms, practices, etc., of monks.
2. a group or community of monks.
3. a monastery.
See also: Monks and Nuns

Monkery

 monks collectively, 1549; monkdom, 1883; monk-ship, 1620.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Is there anything stirring in the monkery, more than com- mon?"
he might as well be in a monkery." (10) Some of my students express as well Mrs.
When Rogers preached on the need for heightened strictness of life, some suspicious listeners accused him of "bringing in of Monkery againe." Popular Elizabethan Protestantism is often termed practical Pelagianism; it might be more aptly called practical Lutheranism.
"It can no longer be called in question," he wrote, that "authority in magistrates and obedience of citizens can be grounded on reason, morality, and the Christian religion, without [succumbing to] the monkery of priests or the knavery of politicians"--or other forms of "ecclesiastical or civil tyranny."(4) The Massachusetts Constitution guarantees that "all men of all religions consistent with morals and property ...
(19) In language reminiscent of 'The Five Sisters', Hunt later confessed that 'if female society had not been wanting, I should have longed to reside at an university; for I have never seen trees, books, and a garden to walk in, but I saw my natural home, provided there was no "monkery" in it'.
Some names are more bizarre, such as The Snakepit, Drunkards Ease, Dunrobbin, Monkery Bottom and The Mad House.
Ariana Lallone was a Prodigal Son--class siren in the tavern seduction scene, with Sterling Kekoa making a mockery of monkery.
De Nugis Curialium covers a wide variety of subjects from the tribulations of courtly life to arguments against marriages and contains, amongst other things, |Incidentia de monachis' (|A digression on monkery').