monoamine oxidase


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monoamine oxidase

n. Abbr. MAO
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative breakdown of monoamines such as norepinephrine and serotonin, thus regulating synaptic transmission of monoamine neurotransmitters in the nervous system.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

monoamine oxidase

n
(Biochemistry) biochem an enzyme present in nerve tissue that is responsible for the inactivation of neurotransmitters. Abbreviation: MAO
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mon′oamine′ ox′idase



n.
a copper-containing enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of monoamines. Abbr.: MAO
[1950–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monoamine oxidase - an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of many body compounds (e.g., epinephrine and norepinephrine and serotonin)
enzyme - any of several complex proteins that are produced by cells and act as catalysts in specific biochemical reactions
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
monoamine oxydase
References in periodicals archive ?
Ridd, "Monoamine oxidase: from genes to behavior," Annual Review of Neuroscience, vol.
There are many very effective medications, but the three types of drugs most often used to treat depression are tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), and lithium.
The other group were those taking the antituberculous drug para-amino salicylic acid (PAS), which lifted the mood.[1] It was later found that reserpine blocked the preparation and release of serotonin at neuronal synapses, depleting the amount within the synaptic cleft.[1] Contrary to this, PAS blocked the enzyme monoamine oxidase that destroyed serotonin after use, thus causing the amount of neurotransmitter in the synapse to increase (Fig 1).
These drugs, which block the action of the chemical messenger monoamine oxidase, differ substantially from the standard class of antidepressants, as well as from newer forms, such as fluoxetine (Prozac).
This is the first study reporting behavioral alterations due to perinatal BPA and NP exposure shown by responses to the disruption of monoaminergic systems, with Tcy having clear and straightforward pharmacologic effects as a monoamine oxidase inhibitor.
The drug is contraindicated in patients during the acute recovery phase of myocardial infarction or in patients with arrhythmias, heart block, conduction disturbances, congestive heart failure, allergies to cyclobenzaprine or other ingredients in Flexeril, hypothyroidism, or current or recent use (within 14 days after discontinuation) of monoamine oxidase inhibitors.
Their genes mean they have a form of cellular enzyme called monoamine oxidase A, which leaves them more in need of stimulation from new things.
Drugs considered include stimulants, mood stabilizers, cognitive enhancers for Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors.
The medications may not hit a key target--a chemical in the brain called monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A), which breaks down serotonin and other neurotransmitters necessary to maintaining a healthy mood.
Major Finding: Scans revealed 43% more monoamine oxidase across all brain regions in women during postpartum days 4-6, compared with those in controls.
Contraindications include patients with prolonged QT interval, congenital long QT syndrome, a history suggestive of torsades de pointes, or heart failure; patients on monoamine oxidase inhibitors; and those on drugs that prolong the QT interval and are metabolized by CYP2D6.