monoclonal antibody


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monoclonal antibody

n.
Any of the highly specific antibodies produced in large quantity by the clones of a single hybridoma cell.

monoclonal antibody

(ˌmɒnəʊˈkləʊnəl)
n
(Biochemistry) an antibody, produced by a single clone of cells grown in culture, that is both pure and specific and is capable of proliferating indefinitely to produce unlimited quantities of identical antibodies: used in diagnosis, therapy, and biotechnology

mon′oclo′nal an′tibody



n.
any antibody produced by a laboratory-grown cell clone, either of a hybridoma or a virus-transformed lymphocyte, in order to achieve greater abundance and uniformity than provided by a natural antibody. Abbr. MAb
[1970–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monoclonal antibody - any of a class of antibodies produced in the laboratory by a single clone of cells or a cell line and consisting of identical antibody molecules
antibody - any of a large variety of proteins normally present in the body or produced in response to an antigen which it neutralizes, thus producing an immune response
infliximab, Remicade - a monoclonal antibody (trade name Remicade) used to treat Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis; administered by infusion; use and dosage must be determined by a physician
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
A monoclonal antibody is a particle that latches on to a specified protein, for example, a receptor on the surface of certain immune cells.
It has also signed an agreement with a leading US monoclonal antibody technology company to conduct feasibility studies for the development of a monoclonal antibody.
Together with our own capabilities for genomics-based therapeutic protein discovery, we expect this alliance to rapidly yield a number of promising new monoclonal antibody candidates.
The anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody homes in on the CD3 molecule, which sits in the membrane of immune-system cells called T-cells and serves as a docking site that helps these cells recognize their targets.
The newly approved monoclonal antibody, caled OKT3, attacks T cells, a subset of which can cause acute rejection of the kidney.
All 10 mice given the human monoclonal antibody survived a high dose of bacterium.
While Seaman expects that the T cell dependence also holds for humans, he doesn't think monoclonal antibody therapy is ready for use.

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