monocratic


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mo·noc·ra·cy

 (mŏ-nŏk′rə-sē, mə-)
n. pl. mo·noc·ra·cies
Government or rule by a single person; autocracy.

mon′o·crat′ (mŏn′ə-krăt′) n.
mon′o·crat′ic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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monocratic

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The significance of Animal Farm to understanding Buhari's monocratic excesses are already too obvious to deserve expounding.
Post-Pulwama, warfare was politicised by the Modi government and the Indian military engagement appeared not as an outcome of a political goal, but rather a monocratic politician's agenda.
Vale informs that it was summoned today based on the monocratic decision by the Minas Gerais Court of Justice (Tribunal de Justica do Estado de Minas Gerais - "TJMG") suspending the effects of the ruling by the Lower Public Treasury Court of Belo Horizonte (1a Vara da Fazenda Publica e Autarquias da Comarca de Belo Horizonte), within the scope of the public civil action no.
The amendment would have replaced the hierarchical, monocratic, and militaristic structure of the Berkeley Police Department with a system of democratically elected, all-civilian "police councils" with full powers to direct, prioritize, and control police activities in Berkeley (Red Family 1971).
type of administrative organization--that is, the monocratic
In a facilitative approach to leadership, the emphasis moves completely from a monocratic idea of leadership towards one in which the leader acts as a facilitator who guides the planning processes, but who does this by involving the people who will implement the plan in all aspects of the decision-making process.
With respect to the local administration, participants also remarked on so-called "technologies of writing" (Remnev), the interrelationship between monocratic authority and the collegial principle (Starkov), and the micropolitics in zemstvos as reflections of competing personal or institutional interests (Guliarin).