monodic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to monodic: monadic

mon·o·dy

 (mŏn′ə-dē)
n. pl. mon·o·dies
1. An ode for one voice or actor, as in Greek drama.
2. A poem in which the poet or speaker mourns another's death.
3. Music
a. A style of composition dominated by a single melodic line.
b. A style of composition having a single melodic line; monophony.
c. A composition in either of these styles.

[Late Latin monōdia, from Greek monōidiā : mono-, mono- + aoidē, ōidē, song; see wed- in Indo-European roots.]

mo·nod′ic (mə-nŏd′ĭk), mo·nod′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
mo·nod′i·cal·ly adv.
mon′o·dist (mŏn′ə-dĭst) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.monodic - having a single vocal partmonodic - having a single vocal part    
monophonic - consisting of a single melodic line
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The Reclam/Carus edition of Luther's hymns is beautifully produced with fine reproductions of the sixteenth-century sources, and the monodic music is very clear and un-crowded.
More difficult to unravel is the extent of Walter's involvement in the provision of liturgical chant forms, both monodic and faburdened, in Wittenberg sources.
That is why we will provide a monodic version of "Our Father" that is less known, to use both in compositional activity and in the course of services, especially during the Holy Liturgy.
The introit is a psalm, or antiphon, sung or said while the priest approaches the altar for the Eucharist, and "Puer natus est nobis" is definitely one of the best-known pieces of the Gregorian repertoire and has become a symbol of the ancient Christmas monodic tradition.
The immediate appeal of Carmina burana notwithstanding, Orff's musical style was often uncompromising, and his approach to dramatic style and textual declamation difficult in its high artistic ideals--much in the way that the early efforts of the Florentine Camerata (Peri, Caccini, Mei) to reinstate the purity of the ancient drama resulted in a monodic style that glorified the preeminence of text over musical complexity.
Duetting is the main musical texture of the western part of the Lamaholot area, in which hardly any monodic forms are found.
By proscribing music that he considered ornamental (be it soloistic, the mixed-voice repertoire of the Classical and Romantic periods, or purely instrumental) and replacing it with a restoration of monodic plainsong for the congregation and the male-voice polyphony of the High Renaissance as represented especially by the Roman School of Palestrina and Victoria, Pius X gave official approbation at the highest level to the aspirations of the nineteenth-century Cecilian movement.
Oversimplified, traditional Armenian music is monodic and modal (yet in a sense tonal)--based on diatonic scales unrelated to the octave and exotic sounding to Western ears.
Reducing FOTPL to decidable (monodic) fragments yields models where inference is often intractable (Hodkinson et al., 2000).
Does He enter into composition with other things?" (Messiaen's musical response to all these questions, as it were, is a monodic quotation of the Alleluia from the Feast of All Saints.)
The former often marshal a curious argument, that because the early monodic sources did not indicate any rhythm, no rhythm was therefore intended.