monohull

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monohull

(ˈmɒnəʊˌhʌl)
n
(Nautical Terms) a sailing vessel with a single hull. Compare multihull
Translations

monohull

[ˈmɒnəʊˌhʌl] Nmonocasco m
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References in periodicals archive ?
There are a lot of rumours flying around that the Italians are keen on monohulls. But many commentators argue, (and there is a general feeling), going back now would be a mistake and counterproductive to throw away the past three years of research and development.
The Transat Quebec - Saint Malo is staged every four years and in 2016 has attracted 24 entries, both monohulls and multihulls, from across the world.
For example, some LCS ships are monohulls and others are trimarans.
The event is open to multihulls and monohulls from the following classes: ORMA, IMOCA, Class 2 Monohulls, Open 50 Class and Class40.
The World Offshore Accommodation Market Forecast 2015-2020 is the 1st edition of the report and analyses the supply and demand for jackups / liftboats, barges (no DP), barges (DP), monohulls and semisubmersible accommodation units.
The first of these 58.1 metre aluminium monohulls will be launched early next year.
"I enjoy the challenge of racing against boats of all different types, especially when the monohulls churn up the water and make it difficult to get past."
Swapping their Volvo Open 70 race yachts, the world's fastest monohulls, for Arab dhows -- renowned as one of the sturdiest vessels afloat -- was an unforgettable experience for the more than 15 international sailors, many holding sailing titles.
The America's Cup traditionally uses monohulls, but the 2010 edition was a multihull duel.
Both boats are being raced for the first time and are capable of extraordinary speeds for sailing vessels but are more fragile than traditional monohulls.
With catamarans, Atchley said, "you've got lightweight boats and lots of sail, whereas monohulls have a huge lead keel."
Worldspan took charge of all hospitality, including booking hotels and catering, in November at Les Sables d'Olonne, France, when 20 navigators set sail aboard their monohulls towards the three great capes, marking the southern tips of the African continent, Australia and America.