monolingual


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mon·o·lin·gual

 (mŏn′ə-lĭng′gwəl)
adj.
Using or knowing only one language.

mon′o·lin′gual n.
mon′o·lin′gual·ism n.

monolingual

(ˌmɒnəʊˈlɪŋɡwəl)
adj
(Linguistics) knowing or expressed in only one language
n
(Linguistics) a monolingual person

mon•o•lin•gual

(ˌmɒn əˈlɪŋ gwəl)

adj.
1. knowing or able to use only one language.
n.
2. a monolingual person.
[1925-30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monolingual - a person who knows only one language
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.monolingual - using or knowing only one languagemonolingual - using or knowing only one language; "monolingual speakers"; "a monolingual dictionary"
multilingual - using or knowing more than one language; "a multilingual translator"; "a multilingual nation"
Translations
egynyelvû
eentalig

monolingual

[ˌmɒnəʊˈlɪŋgwəl] ADJmonolingüe

monolingual

[ˌmɒnəʊˈlɪŋgwəl] adjmonolingue

monolingual

adjeinsprachig
References in periodicals archive ?
The second criterion was the author's monolingual and bilingual status.
The modules presented in Figure 1 and numbered with numbers 1 through 5 require linguistic data (monolingual dictionaries, bilingual dictionaries, translation rules, etc.).
Contributors in educational and applied linguistics point out the weaknesses in monolingual theories and pedagogies in SLA, TESOL, and bilingual education.
One of the most pertinent points made by the volume is the rich potential of monolingual sources for evidence of, and attitudes towards, Britain's languages.
So the vocabulary size is just one of the aspects where there will be a gap between a multilingual who knows a given language as one of a few languages and a monolingual who knows the culture related to that language in a more comprehensive way.
Moreover, as our cultural landscape continues to change, educators must be critically cognizant of a new "special need," that of educating monolingual children and families about other cultures, through diverse languages--mirrors of our cultural pluralism.
The dictionary types used include an online bilingual multimedia English-ASL dictionary (OBMEAD), a paper English-ASL dictionary (PBEAD), and an online monolingual English dictionary (OMED).
Those who study a foreign language tend to demonstrate greater cognitive development and divergent thinking than monolingual children.
Bunta and Ingram (2007) also examined the acquisition of Spanish-English bilingual speech rhythms in children using vocalic and intervocalic nPVI values, and concluded that bilingual and monolingual speakers differ in speech rhythms, particularly in the youngest participants, age approximately 4 years, although these differences diminished for older speakers.
Babies in monolingual households lack these discrimination skills, Werker and her colleagues have found.
Interestingly, while brain scans showed similar progression of the disease in bilingual and monolingual adults, those who knew more than one language were less likely to experience outward Alzheimer's signs, such as confusion, memory loss and difficulty with planning.
Additive bilingualism--the type of bilingualism where proficiency in one language constitutes a cognitive advantage for the mastery of another--has been equated with educational achievement; it has been suggested that balanced bilingual children academically do as well as or better than their monolingual counterparts (Cummins, 2000).