monolinguist

monolinguist

(ˌmɒnəʊˈlɪŋɡwɪst)
n
(Languages) another name for monolingual
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(3) Spivak brings much needed attention to the issue of language hege mony within feminism: "I am talking about the importance of language acquisition for the woman from a hegemonic monolinguist culture who makes everybody's life miserable by insisting on women's solidarity at her price"; and similarly: "There are countless languages in which women all over the world have grown up and been female or feminist, and yet the languages we keep on learning by rote are the powerful European ones, sometimes the powerful Asian ones, least often chief African ones" (379).
It is hard for a monolinguist to decode the hybrid messages because his/her universe is a monoculture, which excludes other referential universes.
I love language, and, as an English speaker, the language of Shakespeare speaks to me because I'm a monolinguist; I only speak one language properly.
Not only did the monolinguist miss out on much of the speeches, with great chunks not translated, but an essential part of the argument - that language to the Welsh speaker is about feeling, but to the English speaker it is a signifier which cannot be engaged with unless you speak Welsh.
No doubt, these poems are sometimes difficult for an Indian English-using audience, but for at least this monolinguist the pain of searching through my Allied Chambers Transliterated Hindi-Hindi-English Dictionary was appropriate and fully compensated by the discovery of this new pace-setting level of poetic achievement in India.
A study at Toronto's York University found that knowing a second language delayed the disease's diagnosis by 4.3 years on average, compared to monolinguists.
He stresses that Wittgenstein's use of 'Praxis', 'Gepflogenheiten' and 'Institutionen' does not mean that Wittgenstein saw rule-following as a social affair, argues that Wittgenstein had no objection to the possibility of someone being born with the ability to speak a language, and provides evidence from the Nachlass showing Wittgenstein was perfectly happy with castaways, solitary cavemen and monolinguists. This is an effective antidote to the 'community interpretation' of Wittgenstein's thinking about rules.
Those English department monolinguists, now bemoaning Eurocentrism, were unaware that comparatists had engaged in such cross-cultural analyses for decades.
Frustratingly for English monolinguists, projection caught had some Japanese dialogue subtitled in French only.