monologue

(redirected from monological)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

mon·o·logue

also mon·o·log  (mŏn′ə-lôg′, -lŏg′)
n.
1.
a. A lengthy, uninterrupted speech by a single character, as in a play or novel.
b. A literary composition in monologue form.
2. A continuous series of jokes or comic stories delivered by one comedian.
3. A long speech made by one person, often monopolizing a conversation.
v. mon·o·logued, mon·o·logu·ing, mon·o·logues also mon·o·logged or mon·o·log·ging or mon·o·logs
v.intr.
To give or perform a monologue.
v.tr.
To address a monologue to.

[French : Greek mono-, mono- + Greek -logos, -logue.]

mon′o·log′ic (-lŏj′ĭk), mon′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
mon′o·logu′ist (mŏn′ə-lôg′ĭst, -lŏg′-), mo·nol′o·gist (mə-nŏl′ə-jĭst, mŏn′ə-lôg′ĭst, -lŏg′-) n.

monologue

(ˈmɒnəˌlɒɡ) or

monolog

n
1. (Theatre) a long speech made by one actor in a play, film, etc, esp when alone
2. (Theatre) a dramatic piece for a single performer
3. any long speech by one person, esp when interfering with conversation
[C17: via French from Greek monologos speaking alone]
monologic, ˌmonoˈlogical adj
monologist n
monology n
Usage: See at soliloquy

mon•o•logue

or mon•o•log

(ˈmɒn əˌlɔg, -ˌlɒg)

n.
1.
a. a dramatic or comic piece spoken entirely by a single performer.
2. a prolonged talk or discourse by a single speaker.
3. any composition, as a poem, in which a single person speaks alone.
[1615–25; < French, on the model of dialogue dialogue; compare Greek monólogos speaking alone]
mon•o•log•ist (ˈmɒn əˌlɔ gɪst, -ˌlɒg ɪst, məˈnɒl ə dʒɪst) mon•o•logu•ist (ˈmɒn əˌlɔ gɪst, -ˌlɒg ɪst) n.

monologue

a theatrical performance or scene with a single actor who speaks alone.
See also: Self
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monologue - speech you make to yourselfmonologue - speech you make to yourself    
speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, voice communication, oral communication, speech, language - (language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"
2.monologue - a long utterance by one person (especially one that prevents others from participating in the conversation)monologue - a long utterance by one person (especially one that prevents others from participating in the conversation)
speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, voice communication, oral communication, speech, language - (language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"
3.monologue - a (usually long) dramatic speech by a single actormonologue - a (usually long) dramatic speech by a single actor
actor's line, words, speech - words making up the dialogue of a play; "the actor forgot his speech"

monologue

noun speech, lecture, sermon, harangue, soliloquy, oration, spiel (informal) He ignored the question and continued his monologue. see soliloquy
Translations
مونولوج: مُناجاة المَرء لِنَفْسِه
monolog
monolog
monologiyksinpuhelu
monológ
eintal; einræîa
漫談独白落語
monologas
monologs
monológ
monologtek kişili konuşma

monologue

[ˈmɒnəlɒg] monolog (US) Nmonólogo m

monologue

[ˈmɒnəlɒg] nmonologue m

monologue

, (US) monolog
nMonolog m

monologue

[ˈmɒnəlɒg] nmonologo

monologue

(ˈmonəlog) noun
a long speech by one person eg in a film, play etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He, therefore, cautions scholars that seek to "decolonize" African media and communication scholarship not to embark on "monological or zero-sum" separations of theory but seek to create "blocks that should ideally mature into dialectical practices, which animate participation, dialogue, and critical engagement of scholarship from both the West and Africa" (p.
In effect, they may contribute to the clarification of what can and ought to be done, not as the monological arbiters of philosophical values, but as morally agentic participant observers in the public deliberation and evaluation of substantive social issues.
Finding its most elaborate version in Booth's reading of Crane, Abrams, and Burke in Critical Understanding (1979), the idea of what Booth refers to as "topical pluralism" is meant as a way of acknowledging the actual different practices present in contemporary criticism without letting that acknowledgment lead into either relativistic, sceptic nihilism or monological dogmatism.
Among their topics are misunderstanding and miscommunication in conversational humor, (im)politeness: metalinguistic labels and concepts in English, contrastive discourse relations in context: evidence from monological and dialogic editing tasks, pragmatics and multimodality: a reflection on multimodal pragmastylistics, and the meaning and context of aesthetic statements.
Conspiracist ideation in Britain and Austria: evidence of a monological belief system and associations between individual psychological differences and real-world and fictitious conspiracy theories.
Five types of exchanges were observed: anecdotal, monological, non-critical dialogical, semi-critical dialogical, and critical dialogical (Daniel et al., 2005).
Bakhtin is also the thinker who articulated the now famous assumptions on the monological nature of poetry in his essay "Discourse in the Novel." These assumptions were not Bakhtin's invention; rather, they were rooted in the Romantic theory of the lyric, common in virtually all of early modern theories of poetry.
Although there are six categories in the taxonomy, we first present four categories marked by monological exchanges that we have come to describe as low depth meetings, signaling the limited opportunities for teachers' professional learning.
Here the author emphasizes the call for "the replacement of monological focus of Western knowledge production with various epistemological discourses, both in the classrooms and in the discussion of a sustainable future".