monomania

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mon·o·ma·ni·a

 (mŏn′ə-mā′nē-ə, -mān′yə)
n.
1. Pathological obsession with one idea or subject.
2. Intent concentration on or exaggerated enthusiasm for a single subject or idea.

mon′o·ma′ni·ac′ (-mā′nē-ăk′) n.
mon′o·ma·ni′a·cal (-mə-nī′ə-kəl) adj.
mon′o·ma·ni′a·cal·ly adv.

monomania

(ˌmɒnəʊˈmeɪnɪə)
n
(Psychiatry) an excessive mental preoccupation with one thing, idea, etc
ˌmonoˈmaniˌac n, adj
monomaniacal adj

mon•o•ma•ni•a

(ˌmɒn əˈmeɪ ni ə, -ˈmeɪn yə)

n., pl. -ni•as.
1. (no longer in technical use) a pathological obsession with one idea or group of ideas.
2. an inordinate or obsessive zeal for or interest in a single thing.
[1815–25; < French monomanie; see mono-, -mania]
mon`o•ma′ni•ac, n.
mon`o•ma•ni′a•cal (-məˈnaɪ ə kəl) adj.

monomania

1. a partial insanity in which psychotic thinking is confined to one subject or group of subjects.
2. an excessive interest in or enthusiasm for a single thing, idea, or the like; obsession.
See also: Manias
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monomania - a mania restricted to one thing or ideamonomania - a mania restricted to one thing or idea
cacoethes, mania, passion - an irrational but irresistible motive for a belief or action

monomania

noun obsession, fanaticism, fixation, one-track mind (informal), hobbyhorse, idée fixe (French), bee in your bonnet (informal) Over the past two decades, monomania has again gripped the country.
Translations

monomania

[ˌmɒnəʊˈmeɪnɪə] Nmonomanía f

monomania

[ˌmɒnəʊˈmeɪnjə] nmonomania

mon·o·ma·ni·a

n. monomanía, fijación mental de una idea.
References in classic literature ?
He was in the condition that overtakes some monomaniacs entirely concentrated upon one thing.
For with the charts of all four oceans before him, Ahab was threading a maze of currents and eddies, with a view to the more certain accomplishment of that monomaniac thought of his soul.
As they narrated to each other their unholy adventures, their tales of terror told in words of mirth; as their uncivilized laughter forked upwards out of them, like the flames from the furnace; as to and fro, in their front, the harpooneers wildly gesticulated with their huge pronged forks and dippers; as the wind howled on, and the sea leaped, and the ship groaned and dived, and yet steadfastly shot her red hell further and further into the blackness of the sea and the night, and scornfully champed the white bone in her mouth, and viciously spat round her on all sides; then the rushing Pequod, freighted with savages, and laden with fire, and burning a corpse, and plunging into that blackness of darkness, seemed the material counterpart of her monomaniac commander's soul.
After five years of it John had not turned a hair; and Sir Claude Champion was a monomaniac."
He had become a monomaniac and an anarchist--not a philosophic anarchist, merely, but a violent anarchist.
This woman might, for all I knew, be a monomaniac. With a stout bearing, therefore, though her manner had shaken me more than I cared to confess, I still shook my head and declared my intention of remaining where I was.
"That won't do, my dear Watson," said Holmes, shaking his head, "for no amount of IDEE FIXE would enable your interesting monomaniac to find out where these busts were situated."
The momentary masters of our land are monomaniacs at large.
Herbert Tucker recognizes the fallacy of the lyric-dramatic monologue binary when he evaluates the rise of the Victorian dramatic monologue not as a turn away from the Romantic, lyrical "I" but rather as an extremification of it: "Browning's first monologists are, in brief, egotistical monomaniacs; as such, they represent in overblown caricature precisely the unconstrained lyrical 'I' whose private (and therefore sincere) utterances" Browning's readers were trained to read.