monorhyme


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monorhyme

(ˈmɒnəʊˌraɪm)
n
(Poetry) a poem that has the same rhyme in every line
adj
(Poetry) Also: monorhymed (of poetry or verses) having the same rhyme in each line
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, ordered copies of Esrefoglu's divan distinguish only between three types of poem: monorhyme, mesnevi, and rubai; the first (and largest) group is undifferentiated as to subject matter.
A discussion of the ghazals cosmopolitanism must include a brief history of the ghazal and its transmutations from the original Arabic: the earliest ghazals were romantic odes included as one of the segments of the qasida--a long, multisegmented poem written in monorhyme (with a set of predetermined themes) that sixth-century Arab Bedouins composed as their caravans traveled from oasis to oasis, reciting these poems at campsites.
Lovelock and Lowbury (53) suggest that Trench, a forgotten Victorian poet, inherits from his involvement in Oriental literature the monorhyme of the ghazal.
Ghazal is a short monorhyme consisting of successive couplets whose lines all end with the same refrain phrase, thus they form a rhyme scheme of aa, ba, ca, etc.
In the bravura array of "new poems," we find monorhyme, haiku, a fugue, paragraphs (a form invented by Hayden Carruth, to whom this poem is addressed), three sets of sapphics, two sets of renga composed with Deema Shahabi, four sestinas, alcaics for her daughter's wedding, a double sonnet, the crown of sonnets, four scrupulously perfect ghazals, and the stanza (pentameter aaba) used by Edward Fitzgerald when he translated "The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.
R]hyme--rhyme" might appear to do the same thing, and it is indeed a direct instance of what rhetoric would call epizeuxis; yet given the momentum of the prior enjambment (allied, perhaps, to our previous experience of the dash as vocal hitch), we cannot help articulating it with at least a trace of heaviness, where the heavily stressed monorhyme ("rhyme--rhyme") draws a little too much attention to itself.
Second and just as important is Hamby's use of poetic form: extensive rhyme--mostly monorhyme and couplets; sonnets; and varieties of abecedarian, including both a wickedly complex form she calls a "double-helix abecedarian" and a virtuosic 26 poem sequence of "abecedarian sonnets.
In place of the monorhyme of the original, which is virtually impossible to reproduce in English, Halkin sensibly deploys, as he does often elsewhere, an irregular pattern of slant rhymes (stone-moon-gown) and almost-rhymes (sweets-feast).
The repetition of the same rhyme, a monorhyme, is applied by Borodin with a satirical purpose.
There was a convention that poets payed homage to some great poet by writing a poem similar to one of his poems, in the same metre, using the same monorhyme, and adopting some of its key expressions.
Borges manages this effect even when he uses monorhyme, as for example in his poem "Arte poetica" in which he speaks of music.