monosaccharide


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mon·o·sac·cha·ride

 (mŏn′ə-săk′ə-rīd′, -rĭd)
n.
Any of several carbohydrates, such as tetroses, pentoses, and hexoses, that cannot be broken down to simpler sugars by hydrolysis. Also called simple sugar.

monosaccharide

(ˌmɒnəʊˈsækəˌraɪd; -rɪd)
n
(Biochemistry) a simple sugar, such as glucose or fructose, that does not hydrolyse to yield other sugars

mon•o•sac•cha•ride

(ˌmɒn əˈsæk əˌraɪd, -ər ɪd)

n.
a carbohydrate that does not hydrolyze, as glucose or fructose.
[1895–1900]

mon·o·sac·cha·ride

(mŏn′ə-săk′ə-rīd′)
Any of a class of simple carbohydrates that cannot be broken down to simpler sugars by hydrolysis. Fructose is a monosaccharide.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monosaccharide - a sugar (like sucrose or fructose) that does not hydrolyse to give other sugars; the simplest group of carbohydrates
triose - any monosaccharide sugar containing three atoms of carbon per molecule
tetrose - any monosaccharide sugar containing four atoms of carbon per molecule
pentose - any monosaccharide sugar containing five atoms of carbon per molecule
hexose - a monosaccharide that contains six carbon atoms per molecule
aldose - a monosaccharide sugar that contains the aldehyde group or is hemiacetal
carbohydrate, saccharide, sugar - an essential structural component of living cells and source of energy for animals; includes simple sugars with small molecules as well as macromolecular substances; are classified according to the number of monosaccharide groups they contain
ketose - any monosaccharide sugar that contains a ketone group or its hemiacetal
Translations
monosakkaridi
monosaccharide
monosackarid

monosaccharide

[ˌmɒnəʊˈsækəˌraɪd] nmonosaccaride m

mon·o·sac·cha·ride

n. monosacárido, azúcar simple.
References in periodicals archive ?
CERC-802 is an ultra-pure formulation of D-mannose, a naturally occurring monosaccharide commonly found in animals, microorganisms, and plants, including edible fruits and herbs.
Therefore, low serum insulin level reduces Na+-/K+- -ATPase activity with poor Na+- and K+- metabolism as a result and so transport across biomembranes as well as hindered monosaccharide uptake by intestinal epithelia occurs.
FODMAP is an acronym for fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharide, monosaccharide and polyols, all of which are carbohydrates.
CERC-801 is an ultra-pure, oral, crystalline formulation of D-galactose, a naturally occurring monosaccharide found in dairy products and fruit.
To 1 ml of the concentrate, 1 ml of Barfoed's reagent was included and heated which lead to the development of red cupric oxide indicated the nearness of monosaccharide.
Dietary free sugar (DFS) is undoubtedly the most important diet-related factor in the aetiology of dental caries.1 Both the amount and frequency of sugar intake are related to the development of dental caries.2,3 Limiting the intake of DFS, which refers to all monosaccharide's and disaccharides added to food and sugars naturally present in honey, syrup, fruit juices and concentrates,1 significantly reduces the risk of dental caries.
HEW & MAH (1989), explored the asymbiotic method for rapid absorption of monosaccharide fructose by differentiated and undifferentiated Dendrobium tissues, and ERNST & ARDITTI (1990) reported that a broad spectrum of carbohydrates (e.g., glucose, fructose, and oligosaccharides) are suitable for the growth and development of Phalaenopsis.
1,5 AG is a monosaccharide that is freely filtered in the renal glomerulus and competes with glucose for active transport back to the bloodstream by the renal tubular cells.
Many researchers have demonstrated that the viscosity (14), molecular weight (Mw) distributions (15), and monosaccharide proportion (16) of polysaccharides have a great effect on their bioactivity.
The term covers a range of non cellulose polysaccharides composed, in various proportions, of monosaccharide units such as D-xylose, D-mannose, D-glucose, L-arabinose, D-galactose, D-glucuronic acid and D-galacturonic acid.
The body breaks down this starch (polysaccharide) into a smaller unit (monosaccharide) called glucose.
Interestingly, the results showed that the DDFPs had similar monosaccharide composition as the D.