monosemic


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monosemic

(ˌmɒnəʊˈsiːmɪk)
adj
(Linguistics) linguistics having only a single meaning
References in periodicals archive ?
Univocity means that for each concept there is a linked term constituting a lexical-semantic linguistic mechanism in which the technicalities used have a monosemic value.
Concerning the structure and liability of the scale, it must be pointed out that the null model presented a poor fit, as was expected, which allows us to demonstrate that the construct of fear of crime is not a monosemic concept, but a polysemic one.
Jungle, a multi-racial, Post-Thatcher intersection of underground rave, reggae bass, electronic samplers, and breakbeat rhythms, offers the Piper the means to play his tune to one, and another, and all at once, overlaying his monosemic cypher onto the counter-cultural discordance of synthetized drum and bass.
Whereas this utterance, as attributed to Jesus Christ in Matthew's Gospel (26: 51-53), was both monosemic and unidimensional, Musinde uses it to demand that hostilities between all warring parties cease unconditionally.
Monosemic, adj.2, Oxford English Dictionary, http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/253725 (last visited Mar.
The metalanguage of definitions is simple and monosemic. Each of these grammar words and patterns was previously defined as follows, by capturing the invariant meaning recurrent in a number of their own collocations and restricted to the meaning relevant to this lexical field.
They are "need-based borrowings", 'necessary borrowings'), monosemic (thus, they lack ambiguity) and denotative.
Although we do not here have direct diachronic evidence, it seems that the are a few languages with monosemic affixes, and a lot with polysemic affixes which could imply that the move to polysemy is a case of diachronic development.
This accords with the nature of specialized discourse, which is the establishment of a monosemic and standardized semantic relationship between a concept and its linguistic designation (i.e., term), and between a L1 term and its L2 equivalent when the L1 term enters a new language.