monosymmetry


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monosymmetry

1. the state exhibited by a crystal, having three unequal axes with one oblique intersection; the state of being monoclinic. See also biology.
2. Biology. the state of being zygomorphic, or bilaterally symmetric, or divisible into symmetrical halves by one plane only. See also zygomorphism. See also PHYSICS.monosymmetric, monosymmetrical, adj.
See also: Symmetry
the state exhibited by a crystal, having three unequal axes with one oblique intersection; the state of being monoclinic. See also biology. — monosymmetric, monosymmetrical, adj.
See also: Physics
the state of being zygomorphic, or bilaterally symmetrie, or divisible into symmetrical halves by one plane only. Cf. zygomorphism. See also physics. — monosymmetric, monosymmetrical, adj.
See also: Biology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Monosymmetry and asymmetry are of special evolutionary significance.
The term monosymmetry is used here for flowers that have one symmetry plane (following Endress, 1999, 2001 a).
Monosymmetry and asymmetry are (immensely) diverse in two respects.
They all have their own special clear-cut kinds of monosymmetry, if viewed in detail.
Still 20 or 30 years ago there were only vague general ideas about evolution from polysymmetry to monosymmetry (e.g., Leppik, 1972).
Thus, bilateral symmetry (zygomorphy) becomes "monosymmetry," radial symmetry (actinomorphy) becomes "polysymmetry," and subtending bract becomes "pherophyll" (but when you look up pherophyll in the glossary, it says "see subtending bract").
Summary: Evolution of Floral Monosymmetry and Asymmetry
Floral monosymmetry and asymmetry come in different forms.
These different kinds of floral monosymmetry and asymmetry are not necessarily all homologous, even if taken in the sense of biological homology (Wagner, 1989, 2007), i.e.
The systematic survey of the occurrence of floral monosymmetry shows that it is widespread and is present in one or the other form in almost every larger angiosperm clade (Fig.
Asymmetry based on modification of elaborate monosymmetry is present in some monocots (among Asparagales, Commelinales, and Zingiberales), some rosids (among Myrtales, and Fabales), and some asterids (among Lamiales, Asterales, and Dipsacales), and asymmetry by different anther height in otherwise polysymmetric, tubular flowers appears restricted to asterids (some Ericales, Gentianales, and Solanales).