monstrosity


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mon·stros·i·ty

 (mŏn-strŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. mon·stros·i·ties
1. One that is monstrous.
2. The quality or character of being monstrous.

[Middle English monstruosite, from Old French, from Late Latin mōnstrōsitās, from Latin mōnstruōsus, monstrous; see monstrous.]

monstrosity

(mɒnˈstrɒsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. an outrageous or ugly person or thing; monster
2. the state or quality of being monstrous

mon•stros•i•ty

(mɒnˈstrɒs ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a monster or something monstrous.
2. the state or character of being monstrous.
[1545–55; < Late Latin; see monstrous, -ity]

monstrosity

1. the state or quality of being monstrous.
2. a monster or monsterlike thing or person. — monstrous, adj.
See also: Monsters
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monstrosity - a person or animal that is markedly unusual or deformedmonstrosity - a person or animal that is markedly unusual or deformed
leviathan - the largest or most massive thing of its kind; "it was a leviathan among redwoods"; "they were assigned the leviathan of textbooks"
mutant, mutation, sport, variation - (biology) an organism that has characteristics resulting from chromosomal alteration
2.monstrosity - something hideous or frightful; "they regarded the atom bomb as a monstrosity"
miscreation, malformation - something abnormal or anomalous

monstrosity

noun
1. eyesore, horror, carbuncle, blot on the landscape Most of the older buildings had been replaced by monstrosities.
2. freak, horror, monster, mutant, ogre, lusus naturae, miscreation, teratism The towering figure looked like some monstrosity from a sci-fi movie.

monstrosity

noun
1. An unsightly object:
Informal: fright, sight, ugly.
2. A monstrous offense or evil:
3. A person or animal that is abnormally formed:
Translations

monstrosity

[mɒnsˈtrɒsɪtɪ] Nmonstruosidad f

monstrosity

[mɒnˈstrɒsɪti] n (= ugly thing) → monstruosité f

monstrosity

n (= quality)Ungeheuerlichkeit f, → Monstrosität f; (= thing)Monstrosität f; (= cruel deed)Gräueltat f; it’s a monstrosity that …es ist unmenschlich or schändlich, dass …

monstrosity

[mɒnsˈtrɒsɪtɪ] nmostruosità f inv
References in classic literature ?
That confirms my impression," said the King, "that you are not a Man, but a feminine Monstrosity with a bass voice, and an utterly uneducated ear.
Now then, go away and take your monstrosity with you," said the mother, pushing away her daughter with pretended sternness, and turning to the visitor she added: "She is my youngest girl.
I could not but wonder what this ferocious-looking monstrosity might do when left alone in such close proximity to such a relatively tender morsel of meat; but my fears were groundless, as the beast, after surveying me intently for a moment, crossed the room to the only exit which led to the street, and lay down full length across the threshold.
As I had been scrutinizing this weird monstrosity the balance of the herd had fed quite close to me and I now saw that while many had the smaller specimens dangling from them, not all were thus equipped, and I further noted that the little ones varied in size from what appeared to be but tiny unopened buds an inch in diameter through various stages of development to the full-fledged and perfectly formed creature of ten to twelve inches in length.
Virginia Maxon had been rescued from one soulless monstrosity to fall into the hands of another equally irresponsible and terrifying.
He was not merely a big snake, I thought--he was a circus monstrosity.
By his tone he seemed to be preparing to resent some new monstrosity in the way of dins and smashes.
He thought the rural Featherstones very simple absurd people, and they in their turn regarded his "bringing up" in a seaport town as an exaggeration of the monstrosity that their brother Peter, and still more Peter's property, should have had such belongings.
There were all sorts of legal cruxes to be thought out, not only regarding the taking of life, even of a monstrosity in human form, but also of property.
If a dread of not being understood be hidden in the breasts of other young people to anything like the extent to which it used to be hidden in mine - which I consider probable, as I have no particular reason to suspect myself of having been a monstrosity - it is the key to many reservations.
In short, Beauty Smith was a monstrosity, and the blame of it lay elsewhere.
Chapter 5 makes provocative comparisons between mythography and emblems, including their rhetoric of monstrosity, while the Conclusion consists mainly of an extended analysis of Colonna's Hypnerotomachia, claiming that it combines medieval and Renaissance attitudes.