monstrous


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mon·strous

 (mŏn′strəs)
adj.
1.
a. Shockingly hideous or frightful in appearance.
b. Of or resembling a fabulous monster.
2. Exceptionally large; enormous: a monstrous tidal wave.
3. Extremely immoral or cruel: a monstrous dictator; monstrous behavior.
4. Archaic Deviating greatly from the norm in appearance or structure; abnormal.

[Middle English, from Old French monstruos, from Latin mōnstruōsus, from mōnstrum, portent, monster; see monster.]

mon′strous·ly adv.
mon′strous·ness n.

monstrous

(ˈmɒnstrəs)
adj
1. abnormal, hideous, or unnatural in size, character, etc
2. (Biology) (of plants and animals) abnormal in structure
3. outrageous, atrocious, or shocking: it is monstrous how badly he is treated.
4. huge: a monstrous fire.
5. of, relating to, or resembling a monster
ˈmonstrously adv
ˈmonstrousness n

mon•strous

(ˈmɒn strəs)

adj.
1. frightful, esp. in appearance; extremely ugly.
2. shocking or revolting; outrageous: monstrous cruelty.
3. extraordinarily great; immense: a monstrous building.
4. having the nature or appearance of a fabulous monster.
adv.
5. Chiefly Dial. extremely; very.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin mōnstrōsus. See monster, -ous]
mon′strous•ly, adv.
mon′strous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.monstrous - abnormally large
big, large - above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a large city"; "set out for the big city"; "a large sum"; "a big (or large) barn"; "a large family"; "big businesses"; "a big expenditure"; "a large number of newspapers"; "a big group of scientists"; "large areas of the world"
2.monstrous - shockingly brutal or cruelmonstrous - shockingly brutal or cruel; "murder is an atrocious crime"; "a grievous offense against morality"; "a grievous crime"; "no excess was too monstrous for them to commit"
evil - morally bad or wrong; "evil purposes"; "an evil influence"; "evil deeds"
3.monstrous - distorted and unnatural in shape or sizemonstrous - distorted and unnatural in shape or size; abnormal and hideous; "tales of grotesque serpents eight fathoms long that churned the seas"; "twisted into monstrous shapes"
ugly - displeasing to the senses; "an ugly face"; "ugly furniture"

monstrous

adjective
2. huge, giant, massive, great, towering, vast, enormous, tremendous, immense, titanic, gigantic, mammoth, colossal, stellar (informal), prodigious, stupendous, gargantuan, fuck-off (offensive taboo slang), elephantine, ginormous (informal), humongous or humungous (U.S. slang) They were erecting a monstrous edifice.
huge little, small, minute, tiny, slight, miniature, insignificant, meagre, diminutive, puny

monstrous

adjective
Translations
شَنيع، مُخيف، فَظيعهائِل
monstrózníohavný
forfærdeliguhyrlig
groteskihirveähirvittäväsuunnatonvaltava
nagy: éktelen nagy
andstyggilegurvanskapaîur; risastór
monštruózny
grozenpošasten
canavar gibikorkunç

monstrous

[ˈmɒnstrəs] ADJ
1. (= huge) → enorme, gigantesco
2. (= dreadful) → monstruoso
it is monstrous thates una verdadera vergüenza or un auténtico escándalo que + subjun

monstrous

[ˈmɒnstrəs] adj
(= huge) → gigantesque
(= atrocious) → monstrueux/euse

monstrous

adj
(= huge)ungeheuer (groß), riesig
(= shocking, horrible)abscheulich; crime, thought, colourgrässlich, abscheulich; suggestionungeheuerlich; it’s monstrous that …es ist einfach ungeheuerlich or schändlich, dass …

monstrous

[ˈmɒnstrəs] adj (huge) → colossale, enorme; (dreadful) → mostruoso/a
it is monstrous that ... → è scandaloso or pazzesco che... + sub

monster

(ˈmonstə) noun
1. (also adjective) (something) of unusual size, form or appearance. a monster tomato.
2. a huge and/or horrible creature. prehistoric monsters.
3. a very evil person. The man must be a monster to treat his children so badly!
ˈmonstrous adjective
1. huge and often unpleasant.
2. shocking. a monstrous lie.
ˈmonstrously adverb
References in classic literature ?
I see his monstrous back, deformed by the shadow thrown by the candle.
Every time he chanced to meet Dolokhov's handsome insolent eyes, Pierre felt something terrible and monstrous rising in his soul and turned quickly away.
A RICH Man wanted to tell a certain lie, but the lie was of such monstrous size that it stuck in his throat; so he employed an Editor to write it out and publish it in his paper as an editorial.
PICTURES OF WHALING SCENES In connexion with the monstrous pictures of whales, I am strongly tempted here to enter upon those still more monstrous stories of them which are to be found in certain books, both ancient and modern, especially in Pliny, Purchas, Hackluyt, Harris, Cuvier, etc.
A monstrous tripod, higher than many houses, striding over the young pine trees, and smashing them aside in its career; a walking engine of glittering metal, striding now across the heather; articulate ropes of steel dangling from it, and the clattering tumult of its passage mingling with the riot of the thunder.
For a time, which seemed so long that the world grew gray with age and sin, and the haunted forest, having fulfilled its purpose in this monstrous culmination of its terrors, vanished out of his consciousness with all its sights and sounds, the apparition stood within a pace, regarding him with the mindless malevolence of a wild brute; then thrust its hands forward and sprang upon him with appalling ferocity
But on the other side, on the flat Essex side, a shapeless and desolate red edifice, a vast pile of bricks with many windows and a slate roof more inaccessible than an Alpine slope, towers over the bend in monstrous ugliness, the tallest, heaviest building for miles around, a thing like an hotel, like a mansion of flats (all to let), exiled into these fields out of a street in West Kensington.
Large trees are about us, and from their branches hang gray filaments of moss, while great creepers, like monstrous serpents, curl around the trunks and writhe in tangles through the air.
So then he was monstrous happy, and talked on some time about what they should do, and they agreed he should take orders directly, and they must wait to be married till he got a living.
The case of Gridley is in no essential altered from one of actual occurrence, made public by a disinterested person who was professionally acquainted with the whole of the monstrous wrong from beginning to end.
Proportions and values were upside-down; the ugly things he had expected, the ugly things of his far-away youth, when he had too promptly waked up to a sense of the ugly - these uncanny phenomena placed him rather, as it happened, under the charm; whereas the "swagger" things, the modern, the monstrous, the famous things, those he had more particularly, like thousands of ingenuous enquirers every year, come over to see, were exactly his sources of dismay.
At last we exposed that monstrous torso (fifty-four inches, by the tailor's tape).