moonquake

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moon·quake

 (mo͞on′kwāk′)
n.
A quake or series of vibrations on the moon similar to an earthquake but usually of very low magnitude.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

moonquake

(ˈmuːnˌkweɪk)
n
(Astronomy) a light tremor of the moon, detected on the moon's surface
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The mission will focus on the lunar surface, searching for water and minerals and measuring moonquakes, among other things.
" India has sent 13 indigenously made scientific instruments that will analyze homegrown surface, map the topography search for water and measure moonquakes among other things, this time also India is carrying a small instrument for the American space agency NASA on board the Vikram Lander.
To highlight the unique nature of a Marsquake, it was compared to earthquakes and Moonquakes. According to the scientists, they simulated the seismic activities by amplifying the tremors by a factor of 10 million in order to make them more noticeable and distinct from one another.
"Our analysis gives the first evidence that these faults are still active and likely producing moonquakes today as the moon continues to gradually cool and shrink," says Thomas Watters, senior scientist in the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum.
Some shallow moonquakes recorded during the Apollo programme were likely caused by tectonic activity, according to a paper published recently in Nature Geoscience.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- A new analysis suggests that the moon is actively shrinking and producing moonquakes along thousands of cliffs called thrust faults spread over the moon's surface.
The analysis was published in Nature Geoscience and examined the shallow moonquakes recorded by the Apollo missions, establishing links between them and very young surface features.
The moon is getting smaller, which causes wrinkles in its surface and moonquakes, according to a new study, quoted by NOVA TV.
In the past, scientists have connected earthquakes and "moonquakes" to the properties of each celestial body's respective surface.
Together, these craft will measure moonquakes, study the lunar atmosphere and take the moon's internal temperature.
The astronauts also left behind instruments to measure moonquakes. InSight carries the first seismometers to monitor for marsquakes -- if they exist.