moot court

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moot court

n.
A mock court where hypothetical cases are tried for the training of law students.

moot court

n
1. (Education) a mock court trying hypothetical legal cases
2. (Law) a mock court trying hypothetical legal cases

moot′ court′


n.
a mock court for the conduct of hypothetical legal cases, as for students of law.
[1780–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moot court - a mock court where law students argue hypothetical cases
court, judicature, tribunal - an assembly (including one or more judges) to conduct judicial business
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
References in periodicals archive ?
While most moot courts rely upon attorneys to play the role of judges in most rounds of the competition, attorneys are often quite successful at mimicking the sort of questioning that an advocate would be likely to receive from judges.
4) Commentary by appellate practitioners shows considerable interest in moot courts as part of the advocate's preparation.
Their participation followed three months of intense preparation in oral presentations and simulated moot courts under the guidance of LAWC faculty Dr Henry Webb and expert mentoring by Oxford University moot court coordinator Adam Levin.
After concluding this review, the PVA attorney schedules a series of moot courts, or practice oral arguments.
The moot courts offered at Georgetown's Supreme Court Institute are in consequence a resource of broader applicability than is the assistance offered by the Stanford Clinic.
Editorial describes methods to prepare and present "convincing" oral arguments, how to anticipate questions from the bench, structure an opening statement and use moot courts.
These proceedings are called appellate hearings; when simulated, they are called moot courts.
Many of these resources, such as the institutions that stage moot courts, are called upon even by the most experienced repeat players in the Court.
moot courts, types of commonly asked questions; basic approaches to oral argument, common mistakes in oral argument, and common attributes of successful arguments.
Editorial covers: the history of oral argument in the Supreme Court; how to prepare for an argument; common mistakes; how to anticipate the types of questions that may be asked at oral argument; how to structure an opening statement; how to use moot courts to perfect a presentation; case studies of successful approaches and speaking styles.