morality


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Related to morality: morality play

mo·ral·i·ty

 (mə-răl′ĭ-tē, mô-)
n. pl. mo·ral·i·ties
1. The quality of being in accord with standards of right or good conduct: questioned the morality of my actions.
2. A system or collection of ideas of right and wrong conduct: religious morality; Christian morality.
3. Virtuous conduct: commended his morality.
4. A rule or lesson in moral conduct: sermons noted for their moralities.

morality

(məˈrælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the quality of being moral
2. conformity, or degree of conformity, to conventional standards of moral conduct
3. (Philosophy) a system of moral principles
4. (Education) an instruction or lesson in morals
5. (Theatre) short for morality play

mo•ral•i•ty

(məˈræl ɪ ti, mɔ-)

n., pl. -ties for 4–6.
1. conformity to the rules of right conduct; moral or virtuous conduct.
2. moral quality or character.
3. virtue in sexual matters; chastity.
4. a doctrine or system of morals.
5. moral instruction; a moral lesson, precept, discourse, or utterance.
[1350–1400; Middle English moralite < Late Latin mōrālitās. See moral, -ity]
syn: See goodness.
moral, morality - Latin mor/mos, "custom," is the starting point of moral, morality, and other related words.
See also related terms for moral.

Morality

 

See Also: BELIEFS, VIRTUE

  1. As moral as any elder of the church —Rumer Godden
  2. Morality, like language, is an invented structure for conserving and communicating order —Jane Rule
  3. Morality without religion is a tree without roots —George Bernard Shaw
  4. Moral principles are like measles. They have to be caught —Aldous Huxley
  5. Morals are an acquirement, like music, like a foreign language, like piety, poker, paralysis, no man is born with them —Mark Twain
  6. The moral system of the universe is like a document written in alternate ciphers, which change from line to line —J. A. Froude
  7. Turning the other cheek is a kind of moral jiu-jitsu —Gerald Stanley Lee
  8. Wore her morality like long underwear —Delmore Schwartz Schwartz followed this entry in his journal with several alternative comparisons: “Fur coat, chemise, a rope of pearls.”

moral

moralitymorale
1. 'moral'

Moral (/mɒrəl/) can be an adjective, a count noun, or a plural noun.

When you use it as an adjective, it means 'relating to right and wrong behaviour'.

I have noticed a fall in moral standards.
It is our moral duty to stay.

The moral of a story is what it teaches you about how you should or should not behave.

The moral is clear: you must never marry for money.

Morals are principles of behaviour.

There can be no doubt about the excellence of his morals.
We agreed that business morals nowadays were very low.
2. 'morality'

Morality (/məræləti/) is the idea that some forms of behaviour are right and others are wrong.

Punishment always involves the idea of morality.
...standards of morality and justice in society.
3. 'morale'

Your morale (/mɒrɑːl/) is the amount of confidence you have when you are in a difficult or dangerous situation.

The morale of the men was good.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.morality - concern with the distinction between good and evil or right and wrongmorality - concern with the distinction between good and evil or right and wrong; right or good conduct
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
righteousness - adhering to moral principles
rightness - according with conscience or morality
conscience - conformity to one's own sense of right conduct; "a person of unflagging conscience"
good, goodness - moral excellence or admirableness; "there is much good to be found in people"
sexual morality, chastity, virtue - morality with respect to sexual relations
immorality - the quality of not being in accord with standards of right or good conduct; "the immorality of basing the defense of the West on the threat of mutual assured destruction"
2.morality - motivation based on ideas of right and wrong
motivation, motive, need - the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a desired goal; the reason for the action; that which gives purpose and direction to behavior; "we did not understand his motivation"; "he acted with the best of motives"
hedonism - the pursuit of pleasure as a matter of ethical principle
conscience, moral sense, scruples, sense of right and wrong - motivation deriving logically from ethical or moral principles that govern a person's thoughts and actions
Christ Within, Inner Light, Light Within, Light - a divine presence believed by Quakers to enlighten and guide the soul

morality

noun
2. ethics, conduct, principles, ideals, morals, manners, habits, philosophy, mores, moral code aspects of Christian morality
3. rights and wrongs, ethics, ethicality the morality of blood sports
Quotations
"Morality is the herd-instinct in the individual" [Friedrich Nietzsche Die fröhliche Wissenschaft]
"Morality is a private and costly luxury" [Henry Brooks Adams The Education of Henry Adams]
"One becomes moral as soon as one is unhappy" [Marcel Proust Within a Budding Grove]
"Morality comes with the sad wisdom of age, when the sense of curiosity has withered" [Graham Greene A Sort of Life]

morality

noun
1. The quality or state of being morally sound:
2. The moral quality of a course of action:
3. A rule or habit of conduct with regard to right and wrong or a body of such rules and habits:
ethic, ethicality, moral (used in plural).
Translations
أخلاقِيَّه، قَوانين الأخْلاق
morálka
moral
siîferîi
moralnost

morality

[məˈrælɪtɪ]
A. Nmoralidad f, moral f
B. CPD morality play Nmoralidad f

morality

[məˈrælɪti] nmoralité f
We talked about the morality of hunting → Nous avons parlé de la moralité de la chasse.
traditional morality → la morale traditionnelle
sexual morality → la morale sexuelle

morality

nMoralität f; (= moral system)Moral f, → Ethik f

morality

[məˈrælɪtɪ] nmoralità f inv

moral

(ˈmorəl) adjective
of, or relating to, character or behaviour especially right behaviour. high moral standards; He leads a very moral (= good) life.
noun
the lesson to be learned from something that happens, or from a story. The moral of this story is that crime doesn't pay.
ˈmorally adverb
moˈrality noun
morals noun plural
one's principles and behaviour. He has no morals and will do anything for money.

morality

n. ética, rectitud, moral.
References in classic literature ?
Once the most favourable order of conduct is found, proved efficient and established, it becomes the ruling morality of the species that adopts it and bears them along to victory.
The Morality Play probably arose in part from the desire of religious writers to teach the principles of Christian living in a more direct and compact fashion than was possible through the Bible stories of the Mysteries.
Don't talk to me about morality and civic duty," he replied to a persistent interviewer.
The Good Judgment of Madame the Virgin,'--a morality, if you please, damsel.
The learning of this people is very defective, consisting only in morality, history, poetry, and mathematics, wherein they must be allowed to excel.
In former days," said Golenishtchev, not observing, or not willing to observe, that both Anna and Vronsky wanted to speak, "in former days the free-thinker was a man who had been brought up in ideas of religion, law, and morality, and only through conflict and struggle came to free-thought; but now there has sprung up a new type of born free-thinkers who grow up without even having heard of principles of morality or of religion, of the existence of authorities, who grow up directly in ideas of negation in everything, that is to say, savages.
Not from motives of abstract morality, but only from fear of the police.
The argument of the Republic is the search after Justice, the nature of which is first hinted at by Cephalus, the just and blameless old man-- then discussed on the basis of proverbial morality by Socrates and Polemarchus--then caricatured by Thrasymachus and partially explained by Socrates--reduced to an abstraction by Glaucon and Adeimantus, and having become invisible in the individual reappears at length in the ideal State which is constructed by Socrates.
veils her sacred fires, And, unaware, Morality expires,
Thus, in his development, Martin found himself face to face with economic morality, or the morality of class; and soon it became to him a grisly monster.
They will judge for themselves of the morality (Scotch or English) which first forces a deserted woman back on the villain who has betrayed her, and then virtuously leaves her to bear the consequences.
Morality can tell us that murder is worse than stealing, and group most sins in an order all must approve, but it cannot group Helen.