moratorium

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mor·a·to·ri·um

 (môr′ə-tôr′ē-əm, mŏr′-)
n. pl. mor·a·to·ri·ums or mor·a·to·ri·a (-tôr′ē-ə)
1. Law
a. A lawful suspension of the payment of certain debts during a period of financial or civil distress.
b. The period during which such a suspension occurs.
2. A suspension of an ongoing or planned activity: a moratorium on timber cutting.

[From Late Latin morātōrium, neuter of morātōrius, delaying, from Latin morātus, past participle of morārī, to delay, from mora, delay.]

mor′a·to′ry adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

moratorium

(ˌmɒrəˈtɔːrɪəm)
n, pl -ria (-rɪə) or -riums
1. (Law) a legally authorized postponement of the fulfilment of an obligation
2. an agreed suspension of activity
[C19: New Latin, from Late Latin morātōrius dilatory, from mora delay]
moratory adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mor•a•to•ri•um

(ˌmɔr əˈtɔr i əm, -ˈtoʊr-, ˌmɒr-)

n., pl. -to•ri•a (-ˈtɔr i ə, -ˈtoʊr-)
-to•ri•ums.
1. a suspension of activity: a moratorium on nuclear testing.
2. a legally authorized period to delay payment of money due or the performance of some other legal obligation, as in an emergency.
3. an authorized period of delay or waiting.
[1870–75; < New Latin, Late Latin morātōrium, n. use of neuter of morātōrius dilatory]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moratorium - a legally authorized postponement before some obligation must be discharged
delay, postponement, time lag, wait, hold - time during which some action is awaited; "instant replay caused too long a delay"; "he ordered a hold in the action"
2.moratorium - suspension of an ongoing activity
abeyance, suspension - temporary cessation or suspension
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

moratorium

noun postponement, stay, freeze, halt, suspension, respite, standstill a one-year moratorium on nuclear testing
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

moratorium

[ˌmɒrəˈtɔːrɪəm] N (moratoriums or moratoria (pl)) [ˌmɒrəˈtɔːrɪə]moratoria f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

moratorium

[ˌmɒrəˈtɔːriəm] nmoratoire m
a moratorium on sth → un moratoire sur qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

moratorium

nStopp m; (Mil) → Stillhalteabkommen nt; (on treaty etc) → Moratorium nt; (Fin) → Zahlungsaufschub m; a moratorium on nuclear armamentein Atomwaffenstopp m; to declare a moratorium on somethingetw (vorläufig) mit einem Stopp belegen; → in der Frage einer Sache (gen)ein Moratorium beschließen; there’s been a moratorium on new transplant techniquesneue Transplantationstechniken wurden vorläufig gestoppt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

moratorium

[ˌmɒrəˈtɔːrɪəm] nmoratoria
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite significant scholarly attention given to tools that the political branches use to exert control over the administrative state, one emerging tool has gone largely unnoticed: regulatory moratoria. Regulatory moratoria, which stem from legislative or executive action, aim to freeze rulemaking activity for a period of time.
This Article aims to situate regulatory moratoria within the existing literature on political control of the administrative state.
Moratoria measures for the outer continental shelf (OCS) establish
A draft proposal seen by Europolitics indicates that the Commission may propose moratoria on new and complex offshore drilling.
Re: "Large majority' of bishops agree to moratoria (Journal Website, Oct.
states imposed temporary moratoria on farm and nonfarm residential mortgage foreclosures during the Great Depression.
David Owens, UNC School of Government at www.mvalliance.net/ Issues.htm; scroll down to "Over-development and Moratoriums" and click on "Land Use and Development Moratoria."
To these landowners, the planning moratoria represented what's known as a "taking." The term refers to when government, either by a regulation (such as a moratorium or environmental restriction) or a physical action (such as taking a homeowner's property because it stood in the way of a planned highway), "takes" the land from the property owner.
and Canadian churches to repent for past actions around the issue of homosexuality and to declare moratoria on electing gays to the episcopate."
The commission also urged bishops who took part in the consecration last November of gay bishop Gene Robinson of New Hampshire as well as those bishops in New Westminster and ECUSA who have authorized same-sex blessings to consider withdrawing "from representative, functions in the Anglican Communion." The report said the moratoria will be in effect "until some new consensus in the Anglican Communion emerges."