mores


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mores

(pronounced moray) customs, conventions, practices: The settlers brought the mores of the old country with them.
Not to be confused with:
morays – tropical eels having porelike gill openings and no pectoral fins: moray eel

mo·res

 (môr′āz′, -ēz)
pl.n.
1. The accepted traditional customs and usages of a particular social group.
2. Moral attitudes.
3. Manners; ways.

[Latin mōrēs, pl. of mōs, custom; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Although educated 19th-century speakers of English would pronounce mores as (môr′ēz) according to the customary pronunciation of Latin in English-speaking countries at that time, 75 percent of the Usage Panel in 2005 found this same pronunciation unacceptable (although 5 percent actually preferred it). Nowadays, the accepted pronunciation is (môr′āz), with a long a as in days and a (z) sound at the end. It is incorrect to pronounce it as a single syllable (môrz), and the pronunciation ending with an (s) sound, which more closely resembles the way the Latin word was actually pronounced by the Romans, may sound pretentious.

mores

(ˈmɔːreɪz)
pl n
(Sociology) sociol the customs and conventions embodying the fundamental values of a group or society
[C20: from Latin, plural of mōs custom]

mo•res

(ˈmɔr eɪz, -iz, ˈmoʊr-)

n.pl.
folkways of central importance accepted without question and embodying the fundamental moral views of a social group.
[1905–10; < Latin mōres, pl. of mōs usage, custom]

mores

, anomie - Mores is the Latin plural of mor/mos and means "acquired customs and manners"; social and moral conventions are mores, and the lack of these is anomie.
See also related terms for social.

mores

The common ideas, conventions, or customs of a particular society or social group.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mores - (sociology) the conventions that embody the fundamental values of a group
normal, convention, rule, pattern, formula - something regarded as a normative example; "the convention of not naming the main character"; "violence is the rule not the exception"; "his formula for impressing visitors"
sociology - the study and classification of human societies

mores

plural noun customs, ways, practices, traditions, way of life, conventions the accepted mores of British society

mores

noun
Socially correct behavior:
decorum, etiquette, good form, manner (used in plural), propriety (also used in plural), p's and q's.
Translations

mores

[ˈmɔːreɪz] NPLcostumbres fpl

mores

plSittenkodex m

mores

[ˈmɔːreɪz] npl (frm) → costumi mpl
References in classic literature ?
Abeunt studia in mores. Nay, there is no stond or impediment in the wit, but may be wrought out by fit studies; like as diseases of the body, may have appropriate exercises.
Oh, how happy!"-- she went on, clasping her hands, with a return to that more childlike impetuous manner, which had been subdued since her marriage.
She thought her husband altogether in the wrong, on more grounds than Will had mentioned.
Except that I should like not to have so much more than my share without doing anything for others.
I doubt whether Chettam would not have been more severe, and yet he comes down on me as if I were the hardest man in the county.
"Niver do you mind what he's done," said Dagley, more fiercely, "it's my business to speak, an' not yourn.
"I'm no more drunk nor you are, nor so much," said Dagley.
Lickspittling is more detestable than blackmailing, precisely as the business of a confidence man is more detestable than that of a highway robber; and the parallel maintains itself throughout, for whereas few robbers will cheat, every sneak will plunder if he dare.
Enraged all the more by this mischance, he commanded that the ungrateful courtier be thrown into prison, and that the glass be repaired and taken back to his own palace; and this was done.
Thus, in the latter sense, it is said of a defeated candidate that he "lost his election"; and of that eminent man, the poet Gilder, that he has "lost his mind." It is in the former and more legitimate sense, that the word is used in the famous epitaph:
It is sometimes fatal, but more frequently to the physician than to the patient.
For example, Bragellos avers their anatomical identity with Man, but Professor Newcomb says they are more like the hill tribes of Vermont.