morning breath


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morning breath

n.
Foul-smelling breath that occurs after a period of sleep.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
After testing the morning breath in 50 patients and taking sulfur compounds measurements, scientific results proved that sipping or drinking water will wash away bad smelling, sulphur-causing bacteria.
In real life, it's not just morning breath that stinks - it's sharing a g bed too.
Reduced salivary flow during sleep can result in "morning breath," being a transitory condition which disappears after a meal.6 In this study, 70.6% reported having bad breath after waking up in the morning.
She later confirmed in an appearance on (https://www.facebook.com/TheMorningBreath/videos/1503764716411085/) The Morning Breath Podcast that she has actually found two dresses thanks to Paige, and it was getting her more into planning.
As well as working wonders for your grisly morning breath, Ayurvedic experts say tongue scraping can actually enhance your sense of taste, removing toxins that may obstruct digestive functioning, while activating what's know as 'agni' or 'the body's digestive fire'.
"A lack of saliva can trigger bacterial growth and pongy morning breath. Snoring is more common in the obese, so diet and exercise is important.
It is especially common first thing in the morning (morning breath) or whenever you wake after a sleep, and doesn't necessarily mean anything is wrong with you.
Ninety-three percent of Dentiste' users reported a significant decrease in bad morning breath after the first night of use and they felt more confident kissing and talking to their partners before getting out of bed.
The list of bad habits also included hogging the duvet, fidgeting, passing wind, sweating, sleeping naked and the early morning breath.
Twenty-five healthy young adults with self-reported malodorous morning breath were randomly assigned, in double-blind fashion, to chew 1 piece of gum in the morning and 1 in the evening containing either 2 strains of probiotic lactobacilli (L.