morphactin

morphactin

(mɔːˈfæktɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) a synthetic compound containing fluorine that controls plant growth and development

mor•phac•tin

(mɔrˈfæk tɪn)

n.
any of various compounds derived from fluorine and carboxylic acid that regulate the growth and development of plants.
[1965–70; morph- + act (ive) or act (ivate) + -in1]
References in periodicals archive ?
Plants are submitted to flower induction treatment following normal farm practice and a week or more later sprayed with a solution of up to 400 ppm of chlorflurenol, a plant growth regulator belonging to the morphactin group, diluted in 3000 l per ha (PY et al., 1984).
Pineapple slip production using the morphactin multiprop applied after flower induction with different chemicals.
The closer their location to the sun, the higher the morphactin concentration of the branches, and branches having a higher morphactin concentration have a greater opportunity to have a new growth node.
Additionally, the morphactin concentration of each node and branch in the plant is updated as the new stems grow.
According to the principle of plant growth, the morphactin concentration of each node in the plant is updated after each new round of branch growth.
The PGSA cannot easily fall into local optimum, because the morphactin concentrations of all nodes are updated during each growth step.
Here is the probability growth model of plant phototropism simulation, and morphactin concentration equations of growing point in trunk and branches respectively.
Their morphactin concentration [P.sub.Mi], [P.sub.mj] are computed as follows:
Trunk and branches have p + q growing point totally, and their morphactin concentration are ([P.sub.1], ..., [P.sub.q+p]) as shown in Fig.
Morphactin and 2iP markedly enhance accumulation of stilbenes in cell cultures of Cayratia trifolia (L.) Domin.
The first treatment used a commercially available growth retardant called morphactin, which arrests shoot growth.
Experiments with morphactin or `mango flowering treatment' (MFT) on 12 properties in the Darwin/Katherine region, increased yields by 150%, on average.