mortalism


Also found in: Wikipedia.

mortalism

the philosophic doctrine that claims that the soul is mortal. — mortalist, n.
See also: Philosophy
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Judaism never developed the elaborate structures and scenarios of the Beyond that Christianity and Islam did, it nonetheless left behind the straightforward mortalism of the Tanakh, where death means (at best) being "gathered to one's ancestors," and the underworld, Sheol, is simply a silent warehouse for corpses.
For Corbett, Dante's Epicurus is at once a positive figure for the noble secular unbeliever, ordering his earthly life according to reason, virtue and an understanding of the natural world while at the same time also a negative figure insomuch as he represents the doctrine of mortalism, which is entirely at odds with Dante's Christian faith.
He compares this reception to Dante's understanding of the secular and spiritual hemisphere of Inferno X, then compares Epicurean mortalism and Christian faith, in which he finds equivalent values.
Paul's focus on faith, not good works, but definitely heterodox in his mortalism (the soul dies with the body), anti-trinitarianism, and defense of polygamy.
There was a revealing instance when the archbishop interviewed Peter Peckard, the future master of Magdalene College, Cambridge, and dean of Peterborough, obliging him to submit utterly to Seeker's condemnation of mortalism.
Their atomisms were no more an 'Epicurean idea' than was Pomponazzi's mortalism.
For centuries regarded by most as the preeminent English poet of Christian orthodoxy Milton's name is now almost synonymous with Arianism, and his thinking on mortalism, polygamy, material monism, and creatio ex Deo cosmogony are well documented.
Burns, Christian Mortalism from Tyndale to Milton (Cambridge, Mass.
This is a harder claim to substantiate: Collins's most vivid engagements with theology take the form of the rejection of mortalism, and many of the commonplace devotional sentiments in her poetry would not be out of place in a medieval lyric.
Heaven And Hell In Enlightenment England conducts a useful survey of ideas of mortalism, of the 'contours' of heaven and hell, of the last day, and of the nature of eternal bliss and torment as they were conceived 'broadly across the period of the English Enlightenment, from 1660 to 1750' (p.
Elsewhere Astell suggests that politicians who dared to "dispossess Lawful Sovereigns, who destroy GOD'S Heritage, and root up the Order and Government of His Church shall Rot" - in Hell, presumably, as if she subscribed to mortalism, which she does not (p.
Mortalism, the subject of her second trial, perpetuates Hutchinson's support for the belief that the body is not resurrected with the spirit.