mortality

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mortality

the quality or state of being mortal; death rate; the ratio of deaths in a given area to the population of that area: mortality figures
Not to be confused with:
morality – character or virtue; concern with the distinction between good and evil or right conduct; the right principles of human conduct: morality lessons

mor·tal·i·ty

 (môr-tăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. mor·tal·i·ties
1. The quality or condition of being mortal.
2. Mortals considered as a group; the human race.
3. Death, especially of large numbers; heavy loss of life: the mortality wrought by an epidemic.
4. Death rate.
5. The rate of failure or loss: the high mortality among family-run farms.

mortality

(mɔːˈtælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the condition of being mortal
2. (Pathology) great loss of life, as in war or disaster
3. (Pathology) the number of deaths in a given period
4. mankind; humanity
5. an obsolete word for death

mor•tal•i•ty

(mɔrˈtæl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or condition of being subject to death.
2. the relative frequency of deaths in a specific population; death rate.
3. mortal beings collectively; humanity.
4. death or destruction on a large scale, as from war, plague, or famine.
5. Obs. death.
[1300–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mortality - the quality or state of being mortalmortality - the quality or state of being mortal
impermanence, impermanency - the property of not existing for indefinitely long durations
immortality - the quality or state of being immortal
2.mortality - the ratio of deaths in an area to the population of that area; expressed per 1000 per year
infant deathrate, infant mortality, infant mortality rate - the death rate during the first year of life
neonatal mortality, neonatal mortality rate - the death rate during the first 28 days of life
rate - a magnitude or frequency relative to a time unit; "they traveled at a rate of 55 miles per hour"; "the rate of change was faster than expected"

mortality

noun
1. humanity, transience, impermanence, ephemerality, temporality, corporeality, impermanency The event served as a stark reminder of our mortality.
2. death, dying, fatality, loss of life the nation's infant mortality rate
Quotations
"Dust thou art, and unto dust thou shalt return" Bible: Genesis
"Earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust" Book of Common Prayer
"Old mortality, the ruins of forgotten times" [Thomas Browne Hydriotaphia]
"All men think all men mortal but themselves" [Edward Young Night Thoughts]
"Man that is born of a woman is of few days, and full of trouble. He cometh forth like a flower, and is cut down; he fleeth also as a shadow, and continueth not" Bible: Job
Proverbs
"Here today and gone tomorrow"
Translations
عَدَد الوَفياتفَناء، وفاة
smrtelnostúmrtnost
=-dødeligheddødelighed
smrtnost
halálozáshalálozási arányhalandóság
dánartíînidauîleiki
smrteľnosť
dödlighet
ölüm oranıölümlülük

mortality

[mɔːˈtælɪtɪ]
A. N
1. (= condition) → mortalidad f
2. (= fatalities) → mortandad f, número m de víctimas
B. CPD mortality rate Ntasa f de mortalidad
mortality table Ntabla f de mortalidad

mortality

[mɔːrˈtælɪti] nmortalité fmortality rate n(taux m de) mortalité fmortal sin npéché m mortel

mortality

n
(= mortal state)Sterblichkeit f
(= number of deaths)Todesfälle pl; (= rate)Sterblichkeit(sziffer) f, → Mortalität f (form); mortality rate, rate of mortalitySterbeziffer f, → Sterblichkeitsziffer f, → Mortalität f (form)

mortality

[mɔːˈtælɪtɪ] nmortalità f inv

mortal

(ˈmoːtl) adjective
1. liable to die; unable to live for ever. Man is mortal.
2. of or causing death. a mortal illness; mortal enemies (= enemies willing to fight each other till death); mortal combat.
noun
a human being. All mortals must die sometime.
morˈtality (-ˈtӕ-) noun
1. the state of being mortal.
2. (also mortality rate) the number of deaths in proportion to the population; the death rate. infant mortality.
ˈmortally adverb
in such a way as to cause death. He has been mortally wounded.
mortal sin
(especially in Roman Catholicism) a very serious sin, as a result of which the soul is damned for ever.

mor·tal·i·ty

n. mortalidad, mortandad.
1. estado de ser mortal;
2. índice de mortalidad.

mortality

n mortalidad f; infant — mortalidad infantil
References in periodicals archive ?
1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mortality rates are much higher for infants of non-Hispanic black women than for infants of other race/ethnic groups, according to the Aug.
In 2017, the highest infant mortality rates in the EU were recorded in Malta and Romania at 6.7 deaths per 1,000 births, and Bulgaria 6.4 deaths, while the lowest was in Cyprus at 1.3 deaths and Finland 2.0 deaths.
In 2017, the highest infant mortality rates in the EU were registered in Malta and Romania (both 6.7 deaths per 1 000 live births) and Bulgaria (6.4 deaths), and the lowest in Cyprus (1.3 deaths) and Finland (2.0 deaths).
' The maternal and child mortality rates have been reduced significantly in the country due to various measures taken by the government," the minister said while addressing a press conference arranged at the Secretariat on the occasion of the Safe Motherhood Day.
Published in January in The Lancet Global Health, the study found that infant mortality rates in Venezuela may have stopped declining and started going up in 2009, which is around the same time that funding for the country's health system began to experience substantial reductions.
Summary: Ahmedabad (Gujarat) [India], Feb 22 (ANI):Ee Despite the high infant mortality rates plaguing rural India, almost seven out of ten infants treated at the Gujarat Adani Institute of Medical Sciences (GAIMS) operated district hospital G K General Hospital, Bhuj were discharged successfully, according to the government data available on Sick Newborn Care Unit (SNCU) website.
Child and infant mortality rates in the Kingdom have declined, though they remain high compared to other Asian countries, according to the World Health Organization's (WHO) representative to Cambodia.
New data reveals the infant and neonatal mortality rates are dropping in the city bucking a worrying national trend.
The highest lung cancer mortality rates in 2030 are projected in Europe and Oceania, while the lowest lung cancer mortality rates in 2030 are projected in America and Asia, according to the study published in the journal Cancer Research.
"While we have made great strides in reducing breast cancer mortality globally, lung cancer mortality rates among women are on the rise worldwide," said study author Jose Martinez-Sanchez, Associate Professor at Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC Barcelona) in Spain.
The switch to North Sea Gas in the late 1960s/early 1970s triggered a rapid fall in infant mortality rates and also increasing life expectancy due to less exposure to air pollution in all areas on mains gas.
Some readers will know that the switch to North Sea Gas in the late 1960s/early 1970s triggered a rapid fall in infant mortality rates and also increasing life expectancy due to less exposure to air pollution in all areas on mains gas.