mortally


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mor·tal

 (môr′tl)
adj.
1.
a. Liable or subject to death; not immortal: mortal beings.
b. Of or relating to humans as being subject to death: "When we have shuffled off this mortal coil" (Shakespeare).
2.
a. Causing death; fatal: a mortal wound. See Synonyms at fatal.
b. Fought to the death: mortal combat.
c. Relentlessly hostile; implacable: a mortal enemy.
3.
a. Of great intensity or severity; dire: mortal terror.
b. Conceivable; imaginable: no mortal reason for us to go.
c. Used as an intensive: a mortal fool.
n.
A human.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin mortālis, from mors, mort-, death; see mer- in Indo-European roots.]

mor′tal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.mortally - in such a manner that death ensues (also in reference to hatred, jealousy, fear, etc.); "a being of whom the forest Indians are said to be mortally afraid, with a hoof shaped like the heel of a bottle"
Translations
بِصورَةٍ مُميتَه
smrtelně
dødeligt
lífshættulega
öldürecek şekilde

mortally

[ˈmɔːtəlɪ] ADV
1. (= fatally) to be mortally woundedestar herido de muerte, estar mortalmente herido
2. (= extremely) mortally afraidmuerto de miedo
he was mortally embarrassedestaba terriblemente avergonzado, estaba cortadísimo
mortally offendedprofundamente ofendido

mortally

adv
(= fatally)tödlich; mortally illtodkrank
(fig: = extremely) shocked etczu Tode; woundedzutiefst; offendedtödlich; I was mortally afraidich habe Todesängste ausgestanden; she is mortally embarrassedes ist ihr höchst peinlich

mortally

[ˈmɔːtəlɪ] advmortalmente

mortal

(ˈmoːtl) adjective
1. liable to die; unable to live for ever. Man is mortal.
2. of or causing death. a mortal illness; mortal enemies (= enemies willing to fight each other till death); mortal combat.
noun
a human being. All mortals must die sometime.
morˈtality (-ˈtӕ-) noun
1. the state of being mortal.
2. (also mortality rate) the number of deaths in proportion to the population; the death rate. infant mortality.
ˈmortally adverb
in such a way as to cause death. He has been mortally wounded.
mortal sin
(especially in Roman Catholicism) a very serious sin, as a result of which the soul is damned for ever.
References in classic literature ?
AN Eagle mortally wounded by an Archer was greatly comforted to observe that the arrow was feathered with one of his own quills.
Glimpses do ye seem to see of that mortally intolerable truth; that all deep, earnest thinking is but the intrepid effort of the soul to keep the open independence of her sea; while the wildest winds of heaven and earth conspire to cast her on the treacherous, slavish shore?
Noel Vanstone mortally insulted me -- say, in some other planet?
A third Indian, mortally wounded, was sinking at the feet of a man whose back was towards me.
I soon found by watching that they were right, and when I mortally wounded a favourite slave of hers for a great crime, she begged that she might build a palace in the garden, where she wept and bewailed him for two years.
As a bleeding, mortally wounded animal licks its wounds, they remained inert in Moscow for five weeks, and then suddenly, with no fresh reason, fled back: they made a dash for the Kaluga road, and (after a victory- for at Malo-Yaroslavets the field of conflict again remained theirs) without undertaking a single serious battle, they fled still more rapidly back to Smolensk, beyond Smolensk, beyond the Berezina, beyond Vilna, and farther still.
As both of them then start up and snap at each other, like deadly enemies, those two beings mortally frightened--so did it happen unto us.
One fell in the attempt, and was instantly despatched; another received a death-blow in the back as he was descending; a third, Stephen Weekes, the armorer, was mortally wounded as he was getting down the hatchway.
I saw many brave men cut down, many fall mortally wounded from their saddles.
The wretched wife of the innocent man thus doomed to die, fell under the sentence, as if she had been mortally stricken.
But General Johnson and General Lyman, with their army, drove back the enemy and mortally wounded the French leader, who was called the Baron Dieskau.
Vanderburgh's horse fell, mortally wounded by the first discharge.