mortise


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Related to mortise: mortise machine, mortise chisel
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mortise
mortise-and-tenon joint

mor·tise

also mor·tice  (môr′tĭs)
n.
1. A usually rectangular cavity in a piece of wood, stone, or other material, prepared to receive a tenon and thus form a joint.
2. Printing A hole cut in a plate for insertion of type.
tr.v. mor·tised, mor·tis·ing, mor·tis·es also mor·ticed or mor·tic·ing or mor·tic·es
1. To join or fasten securely, as with a mortise and tenon.
2. To make a mortise in.
3. Printing
a. To cut a hole in (a plate) for the insertion of type.
b. To cut such a hole and insert (type).

[Middle English mortaise, from Old French, perhaps from Arabic murtazz, fastened, from irtazza, to be fixed (in place), derived stem of razza, to fix, insert; see rzz in Semitic roots.]

mortise

(ˈmɔːtɪs) or

mortice

n
1. (Building) a slot or recess, usually rectangular, cut into a piece of wood, stone, etc, to receive a matching projection (tenon) of another piece, or a mortise lock
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing a cavity cut into a letterpress printing plate into which type or another plate is inserted
vb (tr)
3. (Building) to cut a slot or recess in (a piece of wood, stone, etc)
4. (Building) to join (two pieces of wood, stone, etc) by means of a mortise and tenon
5. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) to cut a cavity in (a letterpress printing plate) for the insertion of type, etc
[C14: from Old French mortoise, perhaps from Arabic murtazza fastened in position]
ˈmortiser n

mor•tise

(ˈmɔr tɪs)

n., v. -tised, -tis•ing. n.
1. a notch, hole, or slot made in a piece of wood or the like to receive a tenon of the same dimensions.
2. a deep recess cut into wood for other purposes, as for receiving a mortise lock.
v.t.
3. to join securely, esp. with a mortise and tenon.
4. to cut or form a mortise in.
[1350–1400; Middle English morteys,mortaise < Anglo-French mortais(e), Old French mortoise, of obscure orig.]

mortise


Past participle: mortised
Gerund: mortising

Imperative
mortise
mortise
Present
I mortise
you mortise
he/she/it mortises
we mortise
you mortise
they mortise
Preterite
I mortised
you mortised
he/she/it mortised
we mortised
you mortised
they mortised
Present Continuous
I am mortising
you are mortising
he/she/it is mortising
we are mortising
you are mortising
they are mortising
Present Perfect
I have mortised
you have mortised
he/she/it has mortised
we have mortised
you have mortised
they have mortised
Past Continuous
I was mortising
you were mortising
he/she/it was mortising
we were mortising
you were mortising
they were mortising
Past Perfect
I had mortised
you had mortised
he/she/it had mortised
we had mortised
you had mortised
they had mortised
Future
I will mortise
you will mortise
he/she/it will mortise
we will mortise
you will mortise
they will mortise
Future Perfect
I will have mortised
you will have mortised
he/she/it will have mortised
we will have mortised
you will have mortised
they will have mortised
Future Continuous
I will be mortising
you will be mortising
he/she/it will be mortising
we will be mortising
you will be mortising
they will be mortising
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been mortising
you have been mortising
he/she/it has been mortising
we have been mortising
you have been mortising
they have been mortising
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been mortising
you will have been mortising
he/she/it will have been mortising
we will have been mortising
you will have been mortising
they will have been mortising
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been mortising
you had been mortising
he/she/it had been mortising
we had been mortising
you had been mortising
they had been mortising
Conditional
I would mortise
you would mortise
he/she/it would mortise
we would mortise
you would mortise
they would mortise
Past Conditional
I would have mortised
you would have mortised
he/she/it would have mortised
we would have mortised
you would have mortised
they would have mortised
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mortise - a square hole made to receive a tenon and so to form a joint
hole - an opening deliberately made in or through something
mortise-and-tenon joint, mortise joint - a joint made by inserting tenon on one piece into mortise holes in the other
Verb1.mortise - cut a hole for a tenon in
cut - separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope"
2.mortise - join by a tenon and mortise
bring together, join - cause to become joined or linked; "join these two parts so that they fit together"
Translations

mortise

[ˈmɔːtɪs]
A. Nmortaja f
B. CPD mortise lock Ncerradura f de muesca

mortise

nZapfenloch nt
vtverzapfen (into mit)

mortise

mortice [ˈmɔːtɪs] nmortasa
References in classic literature ?
The mortise of the lock and the staples of the bolts, when she tried them, were firm.
Initial research indicates that furniture constructed with round mortise and tenon joints satisfies these criteria.
It includes a 16-button alphanumeric keypad, a clutch for vandal-resistance, a weatherized die-cast housing, and a choice of cylindrical or mortise ANSI Grade 1 heavy-duty lockset.
Filling a gap alongside a miscut hinge mortise is ticklish business.
Tests were conducted to determine the effect of close-fitting shoulders on the bending moment capacity of round mortise and tenon joints.
The "closet" problems were four: magazine box too short, cartridge follower the same, magazine mortise in the action required milling to accept RUM rounds (3.6 inches), and feed lips needed modifications.
"Classic Handplanes and Joinery" also teaches beginning and intermediate handplane users how to cut perfect dado, groove, rabbet, mortise, and tenon joints.
Clancy catalogues, I noticed a peculiar device called a "half mortise flat sheave." I did not understand the use of this product, especially given the vertical orientation of the device as presented on the page of the catalogue.
However, certain seismic issues including the roof space system with large self-weight and stiffness, the energy dissipation in the bracket sets due to shear friction (Figure 1(c)), the semirigid connection in mortise and tenon joints [3], and the column base resting directly on a stone base [4] (Figure 1(d)) have not been fully studied.