mosque


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mosque

(mŏsk)
n.
A building used as a place of Muslim worship.

[French mosquée, from Middle French mousquaie, from Old Italian moschea, variant of moscheta, alteration (possibly with influence from Old Italian mosco, musk, in reference to the perfuming of mosques with musk and the mixing of musk into the mortar used to build them) of meschita, from Old Spanish mezquita and Medieval Latin mezquita, from early Arabic (possibly Yemeni dialectal) masgida (attested in early Arabic documents written in the Greek alphabet; compare classical Arabic masjid and Berber tamasgida, mosque, an early borrowing from Arabic), from Aramaic masgədā, definite form (with , suffixed definite article) of *masgid, place of worship, altar; see masjid.]

mosque

(mɒsk)
n
(Islam) a Muslim place of worship, usually having one or more minarets and often decorated with elaborate tracery and texts from the Koran. Also called: masjid or musjid
[C14: earlier mosquee, from Old French via Italian moschea, ultimately from Arabic masjid temple, place of prostration]

mosque

(mɒsk, mɔsk)

n.
a Muslim temple or place of public worship.
[1600–10; earlier mosquee < Middle French < Italian moschea « Arabic masjid, derivative of sajada to worship, literally, prostrate oneself]

mosque

Islamic place of worship.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mosque - (Islam) a Muslim place of worship that usually has a minaret
mihrab - (Islam) a niche in the wall of a mosque that indicates the direction of Mecca
minaret - slender tower with balconies
house of God, house of prayer, house of worship, place of worship - any building where congregations gather for prayer
Mohammedanism, Muhammadanism, Muslimism, Islam, Islamism - the monotheistic religious system of Muslims founded in Arabia in the 7th century and based on the teachings of Muhammad as laid down in the Koran; "Islam is a complete way of life, not a Sunday religion"; "the term Muhammadanism is offensive to Muslims who believe that Allah, not Muhammad, founded their religion"

mosque

noun temple We go for prayers at the mosque five times a day.
Translations
جَامِعٌمَسْجِد
джамия
mešita
moskemoské
mošee
moskeija
džamija
mecsetdzsámi
masjidmesjid
moska
モスク
회교 사원
mečetė
mošeja
moschee
mešita
mošejadžamija
moské
สุเหร่า
đền thờ Hồi giáo

mosque

[mɒsk] Nmezquita f

mosque

[ˈmɒsk] nmosquée f

mosque

nMoschee f

mosque

[mɒsk] nmoschea

mosque

(mosk) noun
a Muslim place of worship.

mosque

جَامِعٌ mešita moske Moschee τζαμί mezquita moskeija mosquée džamija moschea モスク 회교 사원 moskee moske meczet mesquita мечеть moské สุเหร่า cami đền thờ Hồi giáo 清真寺
References in classic literature ?
from an English gentleman in the party checked the adventurer, and then we were informed that so dire a profanation is it for a Christian dog to set foot upon the sacred threshold of a Moorish mosque that no amount of purification can ever make it fit for the faithful to pray in again.
Some years ago the clock in the tower of the mosque got out of order.
And some three centuries ago, an English traveller in old Harris's Voyages, speaks of a Turkish Mosque built in honor of Jonah, in which mosque was a miraculous lamp that burnt without any oil.
He thought that, as in Africa he had to put on a burnoose and sit in a mosque, so in Moscow he must be beneficent like the Tsars.
The pinnacle of the mosque had vanished, and the roof line of the college itself looked as if a hundred-ton gun had been at work upon it.
I saw the rounded domes of its mosques, the elegant points of its minarets, its fresh and verdant terraces.
The 8th of February, from the first dawn of day, Mocha came in sight, now a ruined town, whose walls would fall at a gunshot, yet which shelters here and there some verdant date-trees; once an important city, containing six public markets, and twenty-six mosques, and whose walls, defended by fourteen forts, formed a girdle of two miles in circumference.
Mosques, minarets, temples, fakirs, pagodas, tigers, snakes, elephants
He saw it for a moment, encircled by its walls of white clay, and a few rudely-constructed mosques rising clumsily above that conglomeration of houses that look like playing-dice, which form most Arab towns.
Burch had not said so, but perhaps there were mosques and temples and minarets and date-palms.
Again I gave large sums of money to the poor, and enriched all the mosques in the city, after which I gave myself up to my friends and relations, with whom I passed my time in feasting and merriment.
His heart beat with excitement at the pictures of mosques and rich palaces; but there was one, in a book on Constantinople, which peculiarly stirred his imagination.