moss


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moss

 (môs, mŏs)
n.
1.
a. Any of various green, usually small, nonvascular plants of the division Bryophyta, having leaflike structures arranged around the stem and spores borne in a capsule.
b. A patch or covering of such plants.
2. Any of various other unrelated plants having a similar appearance or manner of growth, such as Irish moss, Spanish moss, and the club mosses.
tr.v. mossed, moss·ing, moss·es
To cover with moss.

[Middle English, from Old English mos, bog, and from Medieval Latin mossa, moss (of Germanic origin).]

moss

(mɒs)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: mossplant any bryophyte of the phylum Bryophyta, typically growing in dense mats on trees, rocks, moist ground, etc. See also peat moss
2. (Plants) a clump or growth of any of these plants
3. (Plants) any of various similar but unrelated plants, such as club moss, Spanish moss, Ceylon moss, rose moss, and reindeer moss
4. (Physical Geography) Scot and Northern English a peat bog or marsh
[Old English mos swamp; compare Middle Dutch, Old High German mos bog, Old Norse mosi; compare also Old Norse mӯrr mire]
ˈmossˌlike adj
ˈmossy adj
ˈmossiness n

Moss

(mɒs)
n
1. (Biography) Kate. born 1974, British supermodel.
2. (Biography) Sir Stirling. born 1929, English racing driver

moss

(mɔs, mɒs)
n.
1. any tiny, leafy-stemmed, filamentous bryophyte of the class Musci, growing in tufts, sods, or mats on moist ground, tree trunks, rocks, etc.
2. a growth of such plants.
3. any of various similar plants, as Iceland moss or club moss.
v.t.
4. to cover with a growth of moss.
[before 1000; Middle English mos(se), Old English mos moss, bog; akin to German Moos, Old Norse mȳrr mire]
moss′like`, adj.

moss

(môs)
1. Any of numerous small, green plants that lack vascular tissue and do not bear seeds. Mosses usually live in moist, shady areas and grow in clusters or mats on the ground, rocks, and tree trunks.
2. Any of a number of plants that look like mosses but are not related to them. For instance, reindeer moss is a lichen, Irish moss is an alga, and Spanish moss is a flowering plant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moss - tiny leafy-stemmed flowerless plantsmoss - tiny leafy-stemmed flowerless plants
bryophyte, nonvascular plant - any of numerous plants of the division Bryophyta
acrocarp, acrocarpous moss - a moss in which the main axis is terminated by the archegonium (and hence the capsule)
pleurocarp, pleurocarpous moss - a moss having the archegonium or antheridium on a short side branch rather than the main stalk
bog moss, peat moss, sphagnum, sphagnum moss - any of various pale or ashy mosses of the genus Sphagnum whose decomposed remains form peat
Translations
طُحْلُبطُحْلُبٌ
mech
mos
musgoaljdlfajijfiefchaifeeee
sambliksammalsammalduma
sammalsammaloitua
טחבי עלים
mahovina
moha
lumut
mosi
muschiomusco
コケ
이끼
samaninissamanossamanotas
sūna
mach
mah
mossa
พืชตะไคร่น้ำ
rêu

moss

[mɒs]
A. N (Bot) → musgo m
see also rolling A
B. CPD moss stitch Npunto m de musgo

moss

[ˈmɒs] nmousse f

moss

nMoos nt

moss

[mɒs] n (Bot) → muschio

moss

(mos) noun
(any variety of) a type of small flowerless plant, found in damp places, forming a soft green covering on tree trunks etc. The bank of the river was covered in moss.
ˈmossy adjective

moss

طُحْلُبٌ mech mos Moos βρύο musgo sammal mousse mahovina muschio コケ 이끼 mos mose mech musgo мох mossa พืชตะไคร่น้ำ yosun rêu 青苔
References in classic literature ?
Tulliver was on horseback soon after dinner the next day (he was not dyspeptic) on his way to Basset to see his sister Moss and her husband.
Moss, his travelling companion and host, who cheerfully asked him if he would like a glass of something warm after his drive.
His giant thoat was far from jaded, yet it would be well, thought Thar Ban, to permit him to graze upon the ochre moss which grows to greater height within the protected courtyards of deserted cities, where the soil is richer than on the sea-bottoms, and the plants partly shaded from the sun during the cloudless Martian day.
The bottom of the valley was soggy with water, which the thick moss held, spongelike, close to the surface.
The first tablet said: 'In the wood, under the moss, lie the thousand pearls belonging to the king's daughter; they must all be found: and if one be missing by set of sun, he who seeks them will be turned into marble.
Gaining the more open water, the bracing breeze waxed fresh; the little Moss tossed the quick foam from her bows, as a young colt his snortings.
The stems of the trees are trim and straight, and in many places all the ground is hidden for miles under a thick cushion of moss of a vivid green color, with not a decayed or ragged spot in its surface, and not a fallen leaf or twig to mar its immaculate tidiness.
said the Queen, looking down on a bright-eyed Elf, who sat half hidden in the deep moss at her feet.
Unnumbered waves Have broidered with green moss the marble folds About her feet.
She compromised, however, by taking upon herself the lighter labours of cooking and gathering driftwood and moss for our winter's supply.
As far as I could understand it, the question between them was, whether the white moss rose did, or did not, require to be budded on the dog-rose to make it grow well.
No water, and no other vegetation than the moss was in evidence, and as I was somewhat thirsty I determined to do a little exploring.