motet


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mo·tet

 (mō-tĕt′)
n.
A polyphonic composition based on a sacred text and usually sung without accompaniment.

[Middle English, from Old French, diminutive of mot, word; see mot.]

motet

(məʊˈtɛt)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) a polyphonic choral composition used as an anthem in the Roman Catholic service
[C14: from Old French, diminutive of mot word; see mot1]

mo•tet

(moʊˈtɛt)

n.
an unaccompanied, polyphonic choral composition usu. on a sacred text.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French; see mot, -et]

motet

A piece of polyphonic sacred music for unaccompanied voices.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.motet - an unaccompanied choral composition with sacred lyrics; intended to be sung as part of a church service; originated in the 13th century
musical composition, opus, piece of music, composition, piece - a musical work that has been created; "the composition is written in four movements"
Translations
motett

motet

[məʊˈtet] Nmotete m

motet

nMotette f
References in classic literature ?
That day, at the Ponceau Fountain, there were wild men and women, who fought and assumed many aspects, as they sang little motets and bergerettes.
Robert and Du Mont cultivated the motet genre in the Royal Chapel for two decades, just as the grand siecle was unfolding, laying the foundation for the motet forms that were to flourish in French church music for the next century.
The Forty Part Motet is a re-working of Thomas Tallis's 16th-century composition Spem in Alium, a forty-part choral composition.
The second motet, "O Magnum Mysterium" by Spanish composer Tomas Luis di Victoria, is a more complicated piece in both its structure and how imitation is used.
Broadly speaking, Zayaruznaya's The Monstrous New Art is about text-music relations in the ars nova motet with a focus on the period spanning 1315 to 1370.
The motet is the genre par excellence in the first part of the manuscript, while the presence of the Office for the Death is notable in the second, in which the verses alternated with simple polyphony and often with an instrumental passage performed by the organ or minstrels.
She composed over 200 works of different types, including a number of motets for solo voice and continuo, some also with two violins.
Based on Thomas Tallis's Spem in Alium, The Forty Part Motet was produced in 2001 and is now in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa.
The three major musical forms of this golden age outside of plainchant and hymns are the grand and petit motet and the lemons de tenebres.
By the end of Chapter 3 Dillon's contention regarding the polytextual motet has been well established, namely, that by virtue of its texture and its multiple texts it has the potential to explore facets of linguistic sound that poetry alone could not (p.
which will include motets for Ascensiontide and Pentecost by Byrd, Tallis, Marenzio, Palestrina and Stanford as well as two pieces in praise of St Cuthbert, one by John Roper and the other by Paul Spicer.