motherese


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moth·er·ese

 (mŭth′ə-rēz′, -rēs′)
n.
Child-directed speech. See Usage Note at child-directed speech.

motherese

(ˌmʌðəˈriːz)
n
(Linguistics) the simplified and repetitive type of speech, with exaggerated intonation and rhythm, often used by adults when speaking to babies
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.motherese - an adult's imitation of the speech of a young childmotherese - an adult's imitation of the speech of a young child
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
Translations
AmmenspracheElternsprache
References in periodicals archive ?
So you buckle him or her up in the car seat, taking the opportunity to shower the sun-reddened cheeks with kisses, get the chubby paws wrapped around biscuits and toys and once you are buckled in yourself and out on the road, you hold a lengthy conversation in motherese about the day in school.
(48,49) Such parents are unlikely to engage in normal speech or motherese (baby talk), eye contact or face-to-face interaction.
Regardless of the language spoken, all mothers use a universal "motherese" or "baby talk" when they address their infants, which is a theatrical and musical form of speech.
Pet "parents" often engage in parental behavior such as playing with them, talking to them in motherese or baby talk, referring to them as "my baby," and holding and cuddling them.
When an adult use the child-directed speech, namely motherese, they overdo the intonation intuitively, use short clauses, reduce the speed rate, simplify the sentences, vary their pitch more often, and broaden the range of the prosody.
(15) Parents may create lullabies to interact with infants, and may couple these lullabies with body movements, resulting in a musical adaptation of infant-directed speech, also known as "motherese." Familiar childhood lullabies may provide a sense of safety for the child, suggesting the safety of the child by the mother.
With your child feeling at ease, she can experiment with different loving words and tones of voice, which may include creating her own form of baby talk or imitating your "motherese." Simple and repetitive, motherese has an exaggerated melody of speech and body language that mothers often use to grab their baby's attention and teach communication (e.g., "Who's the cuuuuutest lil' baby in this whole wide world?!
(2004), "Prelinguistic Evolution in Early Hominins: Whence Motherese?," Behavioural and Brain Sciences 27: 491-503.