motific

motific

(məʊˈtɪfɪk)
adj
1. causing motion
2. of or pertaining to a motif, design, or theme
References in periodicals archive ?
Hayden White argues that, in historical as well as fictional narratives: "the events are made into a story by the suppression or subordination of certain of them and the highlighting of others, by characterization, motific repetition, [and] variation of tone" (47).
The events are made into a story by the suppression or subordination of certain of them and the highlighting of others, by characterization, motific representation, variation of tone and point of view, alternative descriptive strategies, and the like" (48).
The continuation of ideas allowed the improviser to develop motific ideas or create new ones.
50) In a passage displaying intriguing motific correspondences with the one just mentioned, King Hui of Liang reputedly asked Meng a similar question when taking in the view of his pond.
the events are made into a story by the suppression or subordination of certain of them and the highlighting of others, by characterization, motific repetition, variation of tone and point of view, alternative descriptive strategies, and the like--in short, all of the techniques that we would normally expect to find in the emplotment of a novel or a play.
The analysis brings insights into the motific technique that Edwards employed for this work, where eight cell-like motifs shape the first tableau of Kumari, and also the intuitive approach and 'planned randomness' that Edwards adopted in creating the work.
The use of devices such as motific construction and the transferral of similar framings to different spaces are the marks of a coldly analytical mastery, which is pushed to new extremes in this film's repulsive denouement.
These organizational constellations serve as motific guides for both specialists and lay readers.
This is achieved by Greenberg's special choice of motific, pictorial, and linguistic materials from broad areas of culture and from different fields, merging them into a coherent text.
When both the motific characterization of the piano and that of the minstrel come together in the final stanza, the poet-musician combination is completed and the most instructive and effective art form is achieved.
4) Using emplotment, the historian, according to white, then coordinates the "elements" of the event: "the events are made into a story by the suppression or subordination of certain of them [the components] and the highlighting of others, by characterization, motific repetition, variation of tone and point of view, alternative descriptive strategies, and the like--in short, all of the techniques that we would normally expect to find in the emplotment of a novel or a play" (emphasis in original, 1715).