motivationally


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mo·ti·va·tion

(mō′tə-vā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of motivating: the coach's effective motivation of her players.
b. The state of being motivated; having a desire or willingness to act: students with a high level of motivation.
2. Something that motivates; an inducement, reason, or goal: "If your primary motivation in life is to be moral, you don't become an artist" (Mary Gordon).

mo′ti·va′tion·al adj.
mo′ti·va′tion·al·ly adv.

motivationally

(ˌməʊtɪˈveɪʃənəlɪ)
adv
in a motivational manner
References in periodicals archive ?
But with takings massively hit, he acknowledged it had a massive impact, financially and motivationally.
In the instances that count, mainstream economics clings firmly to the belief that economic decision-making is both mechanistically algorithmic and, motivationally, driven by greed and selfishness.
The third motivation is commitment which, as Peter and Schmid write, is 'motivationally unrelated to the agent's welfare, however broadly conceived'.
I played well and motivationally, I was feeling great," he said.
Elsewhere in the financial economy, BDL has sent new and positive impulses that actors in the small, but motivationally important microfinance sector see as encouraging and, along with the arrival of veritable Fintech initiatives in the entrepreneurship ecosystem (see Executive's November report), some announcements hint at new and improved initiatives in regard to cybersecurity and at least further considerations of digital currency at the central bank level.
Self-regulated learning theorists view students as metacognitively, motivationally, and behaviorally active participants in their own learning process (Zimmerman, 1986).
Time and again interim captain Ashley Young had to motivationally put his hands together to stimulate his dormant team-mates.
Teacher participants' engagement was defined as their being invested in, and actively involved in, program activities and was operationalized to include four components: (a) behavioral--they voluntarily approach and persist in program tasks, initiate, and innovate, contributing more than minimum effort and achievement; (b) cognitive--they are attentive and focused on individual and group projects; (c) motivational (includes perceptual)--they exhibit motivationally positive characteristics and strive toward personally defined learning and development goals; and (d) social--they develop meaningful relationships with mentors and peers.
The late positive potential (LPP) component, a positive wave with a central-parietal scalp distribution, is highly sensitive to motivationally relevant stimuli, and is considered to reflect motivational engagement and allocation of attentional resources (Pedersen & Larson, 2016; Schupp et al., 2000).
Coaching is "the process of facilitating self-determined and self-directed problem-solving or change within the context of a helping conversation." (1) It is a way of interacting that stimulates others intellectually and motivationally to reach their goals and often achieve more than they initially believed possible.
Second, these analyses provide insight into the motivationally relevant processes that students were reflecting on while participating in the written portion of the interventions.
The key aspect of these lies is that people treat (or search for) evidence in a motivationally biased way.