gorilla

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gorilla

an ape: It was the second time the gorilla escaped from the zoo.
Not to be confused with:
guerrilla – a member of an irregular military force: They used guerrilla tactics to overthrow the city.

go·ril·la

 (gə-rĭl′ə)
n.
1. Either of two large apes (Gorilla gorilla or G. beringei) native to the forests of equatorial Africa, having a stocky body and coarse dark brown or black hair.
2. Slang
a. A powerfully built, aggressive, and often crude man.
b. A thug.

[New Latin (Trōglodytēs) gorilla, former species name, from Greek Gorillai, a tribe of hairy women, perhaps of African origin.]
Word History: Two traditions of exploration come together in the history of the word gorilla. When Dr. Thomas S. Savage, an American missionary to western Africa, made the first scientific description of a gorilla in 1847, he gave the animal he was describing the New Latin name Troglodytes gorilla. In formulating this name, Savage was making reference to the Periplus, an ancient Greek version of a report (originally written in Punic) in which Hanno, a Carthiginian public official and navigator, describes a voyage he undertook to West Africa. Sometime after 500 bc (the date of his voyage is uncertain), Hanno sailed out of the Mediterranean through the Strait of Gibraltar and followed the coast of Africa southward at least as far as Sierra Leone—perhaps even going as far as Cameroon. In his report, Hanno tells of seeing members of a tribe of hairy women called Gorillai, the name of which he allegedly learned from local informants. In fact, the Gorillai that he saw may have been chimpanzees or perhaps even the apes that we call gorillas today, using the name that Savage bestowed on them twenty-four centuries after Hanno's voyage.

gorilla

(ɡəˈrɪlə)
n
1. (Animals) the largest anthropoid ape, Gorilla gorilla, inhabiting the forests of central W Africa. It is stocky and massive, with a short muzzle and coarse dark hair
2. informal a large, strong, and brutal-looking man
[C19: New Latin, from Greek Gorillai, an African tribe renowned for their hirsute appearance]
goˈrilla-ˌlike adj
goˈrillian, gorilline adj
goˈrilloid adj

go•ril•la

(gəˈrɪl ə)

n., pl. -las.
1. the largest anthropoid ape, Gorilla gorilla, of equatorial Africa, vegetarian and mainly terrestrial.
2. an ugly or brutish person.
3. a hoodlum or thug.
[1790–1800; < New Latin < Greek Goríllās (acc. pl.) name for a race of hairy women in Hanno's account of his voyage along the coast of Africa (5th century B.C.)]

go·ril·la

(gə-rĭl′ə)
The largest and most powerful of the apes, found in central African forests and mountains. Gorillas have a heavy, stocky body with dark hair, dwell on the ground, and feed mainly on leaves and stems. They live in close-knit groups and have elaborate social interactions.
guerrilla, gorilla - Guerrilla is from a Spanish diminutive of guerra, "war," and refers to a soldier of an independent armed resistance force; gorilla is the ape.
See also related terms for soldier.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gorilla - largest anthropoid apegorilla - largest anthropoid ape; terrestrial and vegetarian; of forests of central west Africa
great ape, pongid - any of the large anthropoid apes of the family Pongidae
genus Gorilla - gorillas
Gorilla gorilla beringei, mountain gorilla - gorilla of Kivu highlands
silverback - an adult male gorilla with grey hairs across the back

gorilla

noun
Slang. A person who treats others violently and roughly, especially for hire:
Informal: hooligan.
Slang: goon, hood.
Translations
غُوريلاغوريلا، نوع من القِرَدَه
горила
gorila
gorilla
gorilla
gorilla
gorila
gorilla
górilla
ゴリラ
고릴라
gorila
gorilla
gorile
gorila
gorila
gorilla
ลิงกอริลล่า
khỉ đột

gorilla

[gəˈrɪlə] N
1. (Zool) → gorila m
2. (= thug) → gorila m

gorilla

[gəˈrɪlə] n (= animal) → gorille m

gorilla

nGorilla m

gorilla

[gəˈrɪlə] ngorilla m inv

gorilla

(gəˈrilə) noun
the largest type of ape. Two gorillas have escaped from the zoo.

gorilla

غُوريلا gorila gorilla Gorilla γορίλας gorila gorilla gorille gorila gorilla ゴリラ 고릴라 gorilla gorilla goryl gorila горилла gorilla ลิงกอริลล่า goril khỉ đột 大猩猩
References in periodicals archive ?
As Rwanda prepares to hold the 15th Kwita Izina, a baby gorillas naming ceremony, Visit Rwanda has asked National Geographic social audiences to help choose the name for one of the baby mountain gorillas being named this year
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Virunga sits on the forest-cloaked volcanoes of central Africa and is home to over half the global population of mountain gorillas.
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TWO proud mountain gorillas pose for a sensational simian selfie with a couple of park ranger pals.
Four Seasons private jet guests trek through the forest-covered mountains of Rwanda, where groups of mountain gorillas make their home.
Central African mountain gorillas came off the 'critically endangered' species list on Thursday following a rare and dramatic recovery in numbers over the past decade.
23 Infant Mountain gorillas will be named at this annual event which brings together local communities, conservationists and tourists.
Former Paisley Tech lecturer Dr Alan Goodall is world-renowned for his scientific research into the behavioural ecology and conservation of rare mountain gorillas in Central Africa.
Combined with the 400 mountain gorillas recorded in Uganda's Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in 2011, it brings the total estimated population to 1,004.
Perhaps some of the best conservation news out of Africa for a long time was the new survey that showed that Africas critically endangered mountain gorillas have exceeded 1,000 after years of concerted conservation efforts.
A NEW CENSUS REVEALS THE POPULATION OF MOUNTAIN GORILLAS IS INCREASING.