mounted


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mount 1

 (mount)
v. mount·ed, mount·ing, mounts
v.tr.
1. To climb or ascend: mount stairs.
2. To place oneself upon; get up on: mount a horse; mount a platform.
3. To climb onto (a female) for copulation. Used of male animals.
4.
a. To furnish with a horse for riding.
b. To set on a horse: mount the saddle.
5. To set in a raised position: mount a bed on blocks.
6.
a. To fix securely to a support: mount an engine in a car.
b. To place or fix on or in the appropriate support or setting for display or study: mount stamps in an album; mount cells on a slide.
7. To provide with scenery, costumes, and other equipment necessary for production: mount a play.
8. To organize and equip: mount an army.
9. To prepare and set in motion: mount an attack.
10.
a. To set in position for use: mount guns.
b. To carry as equipment: The warship mounted ten guns.
11. To post (a guard).
v.intr.
1. To go upward; rise: The sun mounts into the sky.
2. To get up on something, as a horse or bicycle.
3. To increase in amount, extent, or intensity: Costs are mounting up. Fear quickly mounted. See Synonyms at rise.
n.
1. The act or manner of mounting.
2. A means of conveyance, such as a horse, on which to ride.
3. An opportunity to ride a horse in a race.
4. An object to which another is affixed or on which another is placed for accessibility, display, or use, especially:
a. A glass slide for use with a microscope.
b. A hinge used to fasten stamps in an album.
c. A setting for a jewel.
d. An undercarriage or stand on which a device rests while in service.

[Middle English mounten, from Old French monter, from Vulgar Latin *montāre, from Latin mōns, mont-, mountain; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

mount′a·ble adj.
mount′er n.

mount 2

 (mount)
n.
1. Abbr. Mt. A mountain or hill. Used especially as part of a proper name.
2. Any of the seven fleshy cushions around the edges of the palm of the hand in palmistry.

[Middle English, from Old English munt and from Old French mont, munt, both from Latin mōns, mont-; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

Mount

or Mount of  (mount) or Mont  (mônt, môN)
For the names of actual mountains, see the specific element of the name; for example, Shasta, Mount; Olives, Mount of; Blanc, Mont. Other geographic names beginning with Mount are entered under Mount; for example, Mount Vernon; Mount Desert Island.

mounted

(ˈmaʊntɪd)
adj
1. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) equipped with or riding horses: mounted police.
2. provided with a support, backing, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mounted - assembled for use; especially by being attached to a support
affixed - firmly attached; "the affixed labels"
2.mounted - decorated with applied ornamentation; often used in combination; "the trim brass-mounted carbine of the ranger"- F.V.W.Mason
adorned, decorated - provided with something intended to increase its beauty or distinction
Translations
راكِب على حِصان
jízdní
bereden
ríîandi, á hestbaki
atlısüvari

mounted

[ˈmaʊntɪd] ADJ
1. (on horseback) → montado
the mounted policela policía montada
2. [photograph] → montado

mounted

[ˈmaʊntɪd] adjmonté(e)mounted police npolice f montée

mounted

adj (= on horseback)beritten; (Mil, = with motor vehicles) → motorisiert

mounted

[ˈmaʊntɪd] adja cavallo

mount

(maunt) verb
1. to get or climb up (on or on to). He mounted the platform; She mounted (the horse) and rode off.
2. to rise in level. Prices are mounting steeply.
3. to put (a picture etc) into a frame, or stick it on to card etc.
4. to hang or put up on a stand, support etc. He mounted the tiger's head on the wall.
5. to organize. The army mounted an attack; to mount an exhibition.
noun
1. a thing or animal that one rides, especially a horse.
2. a support or backing on which anything is placed for display. Would this picture look better on a red mount or a black one?
ˈmounted adjective
on horseback. mounted policemen.
ˈMountie (-ti) noun
a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
References in classic literature ?
A moment later Tars Tarkas had caught and mounted another, and then between us we herded three or four more toward the great gates.
But the little sound caused me to turn, and there upon me, not ten feet from my breast, was the point of that huge spear, a spear forty feet long, tipped with gleaming metal, and held low at the side of a mounted replica of the little devils I had been watching.
She was mounted upon a high stepladder, unhooking a picture from the wall when he entered.
A few soldiers, commanded by a sergeant, drove away idlers from the place where the duke had mounted his horse.
But anxious to find quarters for the night, they with all despatch made an end of their poor dry fare, mounted at once, and made haste to reach some habitation before night set in; but daylight and the hope of succeeding in their object failed them close by the huts of some goatherds, so they determined to pass the night there, and it was as much to Sancho's discontent not to have reached a house, as it was to his master's satisfaction to sleep under the open heaven, for he fancied that each time this happened to him he performed an act of ownership that helped to prove his chivalry.
The splendidly mounted masses of Moslem soldiers swept round the north end of Genessaret, burning and destroying as they came, and pitched their camp in front of the opposing lines.
Those who were mounted gave up their thoats to slaves as all must be on foot for this ceremony.
Werper had still been in advance of Achmet Zek when he reached the forest; but the latter, better mounted, was gaining upon him.
Pinocchio mounted and the wagon started on its way.
Though it was impossible to say in what the peculiarity of the horse and rider lay, yet at first glance at the esaul and Denisov one saw that the latter was wet and uncomfortable and was a man mounted on a horse, while looking at the esaul one saw that he was as comfortable and as much at ease as always and that he was not a man who had mounted a horse, but a man who was one with his horse, a being consequently possessed of twofold strength.
A knight unhorsed might renew the fight on foot with any other on the opposite side in the same predicament; but mounted horsemen were in that case forbidden to assail him.
He descended from the stage, and commanded that several ladders should be applied to my sides, on which above a hundred of the inhabitants mounted and walked towards my mouth, laden with baskets full of meat, which had been provided and sent thither by the king's orders, upon the first intelligence he received of me.