mourner


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mourn

 (môrn)
v. mourned, mourn·ing, mourns
v.intr.
1. To feel or express grief or sorrow. See Synonyms at grieve.
2. To show grief for a death by conventional signs, as by wearing black clothes.
3. To make a low, indistinct, mournful sound. Used especially of a dove.
v.tr.
1. To feel or express deep regret for: mourned the wasted years.
2. To grieve over (someone who has died).
3. To utter sorrowfully.

[Middle English mornen, from Old English murnan, to be anxious, care about, yearn, mourn; see (s)mer- in Indo-European roots.]

mourn′er n.
mourn′ing·ly adv.

mourner

(ˈmɔːnə)
n
1. a person who mourns, esp at a funeral
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (at US revivalist meetings) a person who repents publicly

mourn•er

(ˈmɔr nər, ˈmoʊr-)

n.
1. a person who mourns.
2. a person who attends a funeral to mourn for the deceased.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mourner - a person who is feeling grief (as grieving over someone who has died)mourner - a person who is feeling grief (as grieving over someone who has died)
unfortunate, unfortunate person - a person who suffers misfortune
pallbearer, bearer - one of the mourners carrying the coffin at a funeral
wailer - a mourner who utters long loud high-pitched cries
weeper - a hired mourner
Translations
نادِب، نائِح، نادِبَه، نائِحَه
pozůstalýtruchlící
sørgende
surija
syrgjandi
smútiaci pozostalý
žalujoči
matemliyaslı

mourner

[ˈmɔːnəʳ] Ndoliente mf; (hired) → plañidero/a m/f

mourner

[ˈmɔːrr] n (at funeral)proche m/f du défunt

mourner

nTrauernde(r) mf; (= non-relative at funeral)Trauergast m

mourner

[ˈmɔːnəʳ] nchi piange un defunto

mourn

(moːn) verb
to have or show great sorrow eg for a person who has died. She mourned (for) her dead son.
ˈmourner noun
The mourners stood round the graveside.
ˈmournful adjective
feeling or showing sorrow. a mournful expression.
ˈmournfully adverb
ˈmourning noun
1. grief shown eg because of someone's death.
2. black or dark-coloured clothes suitable for a mourner. She was wearing mourning.
References in classic literature ?
The mourner sat with bowed head, rocking her body heavily to and fro, and crying out in a high, strained voice that sounded like a dirge on some forlorn pipe.
I don't know if it be a peculiarity in me, but I am seldom otherwise than happy while watching in the chamber of death, should no frenzied or despairing mourner share the duty with me.
Prejudice or no prejudice, Pudd'nhead, I don't like them, and when they get their deserts you're not going to find me sitting on the mourner's bench."
The same grave expression of grief, the same rigid silence, and the same deference to the principal mourner, were observed around the place of interment as have been already described.
But in the morning all the ordinary currents of conjecture were disturbed by the presence of a strange mourner who had plashed among them as if from the moon.
Ah, Barbara, darling, I can see that you want me to be taken away to the Volkovo Cemetery in a broken-down old hearse, with some poor outcast of the streets to accompany my coffin as chief mourner, and the gravediggers to heap my body with clay, and depart and leave me there.
His son obeyed, and the crowd approached; they were bawling and hissing round a dingy hearse and dingy mourning coach, in which mourning coach there was only one mourner, dressed in the dingy trappings that were considered essential to the dignity of the position.
Folks got up everywheres in the crowd, and worked their way just by main strength to the mourners' bench, with the tears running down their faces; and when all the mourners had got up there to the front benches in a crowd, they sung and shouted and flung themselves down on the straw, just crazy and wild.
There was finally a waiting pause, an expectant dumbness, and then Aunt Polly entered, followed by Sid and Mary, and they by the Harper family, all in deep black, and the whole congregation, the old minister as well, rose reverently and stood until the mourners were seated in the front pew.
First came an old man and women, like chief mourners at a funeral, attired from head to foot in the deepest black, all but their pale features and hoary hair; he leaning on a staff, and supporting her decrepit form with his nerveless arm.
The mourners sprang forward to the coffin, the friends followed, and as the clock on the mantel solemnly struck three all were staring down upon the face of John Mortonson, deceased.
The undertaker, instructed to spare no expense, provided long-tailed black horses, with black palls on their backs and black plumes upon their foreheads; coachmen decorated with scarves and jack-boots, black hammercloths, cloaks, and gloves, with many hired mourners, who, however, would have been instantly discharged had they presumed to betray emotion, or in any way overstep their function of walking beside the hearse with brass-tipped batons in their hands.