mousy

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mous·y

also mous·ey  (mou′sē, -zē)
adj. mous·i·er, mous·i·est
1. Resembling a mouse, especially:
a. Having a drab, pale brown color: mousy hair.
b. Having small sharp features: a mousy face.
c. Quiet; timid; shy.
2. Infested with mice.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mousy

(ˈmaʊsɪ) ,

mousey

or

mousie

adj, mousier or mousiest
1. (Hairdressing & Grooming) resembling a mouse, esp in having a light brown or greyish hair colour
2. shy or ineffectual: a mousy little woman.
3. (Zoology) infested with mice
ˈmousily adv
ˈmousiness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mous•y

or mous•ey

(ˈmaʊ si, -zi)

adj. mous•i•er, mous•i•est.
1. resembling or suggesting a mouse, as in being drab and colorless or meek and timid.
2. infested with mice.
[1805–15]
mous′i•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mousy - quiet and timid and ineffectual
timid - showing fear and lack of confidence
2.mousy - infested with mice
3.mousy - of something having a drab pale brown color resembling a mouse; "a mousy brownish-grey color"; "mousy hair"; "mouse-colored hair"
chromatic - being or having or characterized by hue
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

mousy

mousey
adjective
1. brownish, plain, dull, drab, colourless, indeterminate a man of medium build and collar-length mousy hair
2. shy, quiet, timid, ineffectual, self-effacing, diffident, timorous, unassertive He remembered her as a small, mousy woman, invariably worried.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
بِلَوْن الفَأْرجَبان، رِعْديد
mdle hnědýnesmělýnudný
forskræmtkedeligkommunefarvet
egérszürke
grábrúnn á litinnóframfærinn
hnedosivá farba
çekingendonuk kahverengi

mousy

[ˈmaʊsɪ] ADJ (mousier (compar) (mousiest (superl))) [person] → tímido; [colour, hair] → pardusco
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mousy

[ˈmaʊsi] adj
[person] → effacé(e)
[hair] → (brun) terne
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

mousy

, mousey
adj (+er) (= timid, shy)schüchtern; (= nondescript)farblos, unscheinbar; colour, hairmausgrau
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

mousy

mousey [ˈmaʊsɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (person) → timido/a, schivo/a
mousy hair → capelli color castano spento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

mouse

(maus) plural mice (mais) noun
1. any of several types of small furry gnawing animal with a long tail, found in houses and in fields.
2. (computers) a device that is used to move the cursor on a computer screen and to give instructions to a computer.
ˈmousy adjective
1. (of hair) dull brown in colour.
2. timid; uninteresting. a mousy little woman.
ˈmousehole noun
a hole made or used by mice.
ˈmousetrap noun
a mechanical trap for a mouse.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Michelle Flaherty Mousily played by Alison Hannigan in the American Pie series of films, this titianthatched dark horse confirmed the old adage that's it's the quiet ones you have to watch.
Peg, and those like her, who mousily worked any time, under any conditions, at any cost to their personal lives and families, and never demanded the recognition and appreciation they were due, are in no small part responsible for the ever-worsening shortage of competent laboratory professionals.
Likewise, in this piece, a famously fashionable, bestselling "femi-demic," Margot Mason (expertly played by Sue Ingleton), has her writer's block interrupted by Molly (mousily ferocious Bojana Novakovic).