moviemaker

(redirected from moviemakers)

mov·ie·mak·er

 (mo͞o′vē-mā′kər)
n.
One that makes movies, especially professionally.

mov′ie·mak′ing adj. & n.

moviemaker

(ˈmuːvɪˌmeɪkə)
n
someone who makes cinema films

film•mak•er

(ˈfɪlmˌmeɪ kər)

n.
a producer or director of motion pictures.
[1905–10]
film′mak`ing, n.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, they will keep communication channels open with moviemakers Warner Brothers to reach a deal over work on the second Harry Potter film which is due to go into production soon.
Like the new premier of Quebec, Pierre Falardeau -- the gangsta rapper, the Eminem of Quebec moviemakers -- feels no obligation to tone down his indignation and contempt.
When the unofficial season of lesbian and gay film festivals kicks off this month with events in New York City and San Francisco and in July in Los Angeles, gay moviemakers: won't be the only ones in attendance.
For the moviemakers involved, recreating 1940s Vichy France in Canada was one of the project's biggest and most exhilarating challenges.
GORDON Brown is set to give British moviemakers a pounds 40million tax break in Wednesday's Budget.
US moviemakers failed to rate the Monty Python classic starring Graham Chapman.
Taking a cue from Forsyth's work, and perhaps his views on fact-based drama [Ed's note: see following interview with Forsyth], the moviemakers aimed at what they call "emotional truth," rather than finicky verisimilitude.
It was a technological break, born of the desire of artists to be mobile." The story of the moviemakers who first breathed life into verite is one of the best known in cinema history.
A FILM academy producing the next generation of Irish moviemakers has been branded a dump by students who have gone on strike.
Last winter, producer Roger Frappier yanked his releases out of the Genie pool and admonished "English" Canadians for ignoring Quebec films; however, like numerous other French-Canadian moviemakers, he decided to shoot potentially exportable English-language features.
Moviemakers caused a storm of criticism when they advertised for "skinny children" to portray street urchins of the 1930s.
I don't like literary cinema where the characters are always explaining themselves." As we talked about Quebecois moviemakers of the 1960s and `70s as compared to his generation's, Villeneuve pinpoints a fundamental difference.