mucilage


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mu·ci·lage

 (myo͞o′sə-lĭj)
n.
1. Any of various viscous, water-soluble polysaccharides produced by certain plants, algae, and microorganisms.
2. A sticky substance used as an adhesive.

[Middle English muscilage, from Old French mucilage, from Late Latin mūcilāgō, mūcilāgin-, from Latin mūcēre, to be moldy, musty, from mūcus, mucus.]

mucilage

(ˈmjuːsɪlɪdʒ)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds) a sticky preparation, such as gum or glue, used as an adhesive
2. (Biochemistry) a complex glutinous carbohydrate secreted by certain plants
[C14: via Old French from Late Latin mūcilāgo mouldy juice; see mucid]
mucilaginous adj
ˌmuciˈlaginously adv
ˌmuciˈlaginousness n

mu•ci•lage

(ˈmyu sə lɪdʒ)

n.
1. any of various, usu. liquid, preparations of gum, glue, or the like, used as an adhesive.
2. a gummy or gelatinous substance present in plants.
[1350–1400; < Middle French musillage < Late Latin mūcilāgō a musty juice, akin to Latin mūcēre to be musty]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mucilage - a gelatinous substance secreted by plants
gum - any of various substances (soluble in water) that exude from certain plants; they are gelatinous when moist but harden on drying
2.mucilage - cement consisting of a sticky substance that is used as an adhesivemucilage - cement consisting of a sticky substance that is used as an adhesive
animal glue - a protein gelatin obtained by boiling e.g. skins and hoofs of cattle and horses
casein glue - made from casein; used for e.g. plywood and cabinetwork
fish glue - gelatinous substance obtained by boiling skins fins and bones of fish
marine glue - glue that is not water soluble
cement - something that hardens to act as adhesive material
Translations

mucilage

[ˈmjuːsɪlɪdʒ] Nmucílago m

mucilage

[ˈmjuːsɪlɪdʒ] nmucillagine f
References in classic literature ?
That ninny of a Sara Ray brought up a bottle of mucilage instead of Judy's curling-fluid, and Cecily put her hair up with THAT.
Eventually they got all the mucilage washed out of it and Cecily spent the remainder of the forenoon sitting before the open oven door in the hot kitchen drying her ill-used tresses.
She didn't mean to bring me mucilage. It's really all my own fault, I know.
And when I desired honey I only desired bait, and sweet mucus and mucilage, for which even the mouths of growling bears, and strange, sulky, evil birds, water:
But the air was sticky like mucilage, and the weight of it seemed to burden the lungs and make breathing difficult.
Those childhood favourites mustard and cress are not, however, suitable for sprouting in containers because their seed coats produce slimy mucilage.
The loss, of course, represents but a mere drop in the ocean to Abramovich, a man who constantly looks as though he's mistakenly just swallowed his own nasal mucilage.
The existence of genetic diversity regarding mucilage content and properties is necessary to improve this trait by breeding.
In the foliar study, all species have stomata confined to the lower surface, hairs stellate, dorsiventral mesophyll, mucilage canals and lingering vascular sheaths.
It contains an extract of marshmallow called mucilage which loosens and helps eliminate phlegm.
To explore potential water-purifying applications, the scientists investigated the cactus' mucilage, the thick, gooey substance that enables the plant to store large amounts of water.
He describes microbial diversity and freshwater ecosystems, including the food web in lentic and lotic systems; freshwater environments such as lakes, wetlands, streams, rivers, and estuaries and adverse and extreme environments within them; algae, including its taxonomy, molecular characterization, size, shape, surface mucilage, activities, and strategies for survival.