mudsill


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mud·sill

 (mŭd′sĭl′)
n.
1. The lowest sill supporting a building, resting directly on the foundation.
2. A horizontal timber resting on the ground or on the bottom of a body of water, as to support a scaffold, dam, or bridge pier.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mudsill

(ˈmʌdˌsɪl)
n
1. (Building) a building support located at or below ground
2. censorious a person from the lowest social class
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in classic literature ?
A mudsill like me trying to push in and help receive an awful grandee like Edward J.
These investigations were driven by modern construction activities facilitating wall stabilization, such as mudsill footings for levelling scaffolding.
The bottom beam had a frame structure made up of one front mudsill, one back mudsill, one middle mudsill, and two side mudsills.
The government's job was to level the playing field and establish the physical, legal, and political infrastructure to "make men free." Against this egalitarian vision was one that sanctified private property, seeing its defense as essential to ordered liberty, even if the result was a highly stratified society where the poor remain locked in a perpetual "mudsill" and the rich grew richer.
Holes were drilled at the center of each void 5.1 cm above the mudsill plate to facilitate insertion of the distal end of the scope.
Julius Streicher was a man none of his adherents and admirers needed to look up to: a "horizontal attractor," a mudsill for the New Order.
Then the soldiers went overseas; the lucky ones got away from the segregation and discrimination and mudsill jobs stateside.
The product is a strip of tacky material applied in a horizontal manner to the inside of the foundation, just below the mudsill, and also around piers, just below the pad.
Memoirs of a Dutch Mudsill: The "War Memories" of John Henry Otto, Captain, Company D, 21st Regiment Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.
Calhoun and Governor George McDuffie of South Carolina, defended slavery on the 'mudsill' theory of social organization.
The difference between them, Du Bois told the precocious editor of the Lovestoneite Revolutionary Age, was that Herberg sincerely believed that the attainment by white workers of their class interests would "make them rise above racial antipathy." On the other hand, he, Du Bois, was certain that race hatred would persist in the United States "even when the lines of the class struggle are closely defined and the Russian experience is so definite that it does not disprove but rather strengthens my belief." White Alabama and Arkansas workers organized by the Communists would prevent black workers from rising out of the mudsill by mob action and apartheid laws, Du Bois claimed, just as their northern counterparts had historically done through urban riots and exclusionary union rules.
Mudsill anchors 6 2x10 x 14' treated joists, ledger and beam 21 2x6 x 10' treated ledger and beam 3 2x6 x 8' treated joists 8 2x10 joist hangers 30 2x10 end joist hangers 2 2x6 joist hangers 14 2x6 double beam hanger 2 Joist hanger nails 5 lbs.