mulberry


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mul·ber·ry

 (mŭl′bĕr′ē, -bə-rē)
n.
1.
a. Any of several deciduous trees of the genus Morus, having unisexual flowers in drooping catkins and edible usually purple fruit.
b. The sweet fruit of any of these trees.
2. A grayish to dark purple. Also called murrey.

[Middle English mulberrie, from Old English mōrberie and Middle Low German mūlberi, mūrberi : both from Latin mōrum + Old English berie, berry or Old High German beri, berry; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

mul′ber′ry adj.

mulberry

(ˈmʌlbərɪ; -brɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Plants) any moraceous tree of the temperate genus Morus, having edible blackberry-like fruit, such as M. alba (white mulberry), the leaves of which are used to feed silkworms
2. (Cookery) the fruit of any of these trees
3. (Plants) any of several similar or related trees, such as the paper mulberry and Indian mulberry
4. (Colours)
a. a dark purple colour
b. (as adjective): a mulberry dress.
[C14: from Latin mōrum, from Greek moron; related to Old English mōrberie; compare Dutch moerbezie, Old High German mūrberi]

mul•ber•ry

(ˈmʌlˌbɛr i, -bə ri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. the edible, berrylike collective fruit of any tree of the genus Morus.
2. a tree of this genus, as the red mulberry.
[1225–75; Middle English mulberie, dissimilated variant of murberie, Old English mōrberie=mōr- (< Latin mōrum mulberry) + berie berry]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mulberry - any of several trees of the genus Morus having edible fruit that resembles the blackberrymulberry - any of several trees of the genus Morus having edible fruit that resembles the blackberry
mulberry - sweet usually dark purple blackberry-like fruit of any of several mulberry trees of the genus Morus
genus Morus, Morus - type genus of the Moraceae: mulberries
Morus alba, white mulberry - Asiatic mulberry with white to pale red fruit; leaves used to feed silkworms
black mulberry, Morus nigra - European mulberry having dark foliage and fruit
Morus rubra, red mulberry - North American mulberry having dark purple edible fruit
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
2.mulberry - sweet usually dark purple blackberry-like fruit of any of several mulberry trees of the genus Morus
berry - any of numerous small and pulpy edible fruits; used as desserts or in making jams and jellies and preserves
mulberry, mulberry tree - any of several trees of the genus Morus having edible fruit that resembles the blackberry
Translations
ثَمَر التّوتشَجَرَة التّوت
morušemorušovník
morbærmorbærtræ
توت
dudmurva
eperfafaeper
mórbermórberjatré
mora
šilkmedisšilkmedžio vaisius
zīdkoka ogaszīdkoks
morwa
morušovník
murva
dutdut ağacı

mulberry

[ˈmʌlbərɪ] N (= fruit) → mora f; (= tree) → morera f, moral m

mulberry

[ˈmʌlbəri] n
(= fruit) → mûre f
(= tree) → mûrier m

mulberry

n (= fruit)Maulbeere f; (= tree)Maulbeerbaum m; (= colour)Aubergine nt, → dunkles Violett

mulberry

[ˈmʌlbrɪ] n (fruit) → mora (di gelso); (tree) → gelso, moro
black mulberry → gelso nero

mulberry

(ˈmalbəri) plural ˈmulberries noun
1. a type of tree on whose leaves silkworms feed.
2. its (usually purple) fruit.
References in classic literature ?
Nor me, Nickleby,' cried a gentleman with a flushed face and a flash air, from the elbow of Sir Mulberry Hawk.
Nickleby,' said Sir Mulberry Hawk, in a thick coarse voice, 'take the hint, and tack it on the other five-and-twenty, or whatever it is, and give me half for the advice.
Sir Mulberry garnished this speech with a hoarse laugh, and terminated it with a pleasant oath regarding Mr Nickleby's limbs, whereat Messrs Pyke and Pluck laughed consumedly.
These gentlemen had not yet quite recovered the jest, when dinner was announced, and then they were thrown into fresh ecstasies by a similar cause; for Sir Mulberry Hawk, in an excess of humour, shot dexterously past Lord Frederick Verisopht who was about to lead Kate downstairs, and drew her arm through his up to the elbow.
Weller, the first time his eyes encountered the glance of the stranger in the mulberry suit, who had a large, sallow, ugly face, very sunken eyes, and a gigantic head, from which depended a quantity of lank black hair.
Well, that is very strange,' said the mulberry man, with great simplicity of manner.
As the mulberry man said this, he turned his glass upside down, by way of reminding his companion that he had nothing left wherewith to slake his thirst.
I should rather suspect it was,' said the mulberry man, sipping his liquor, with a complacent face.
The older children turned back when we reached the hedge, but Jan and Nina and Lucie crept through it by a hole known only to themselves and hid under the low-branching mulberry bushes.
It was surrounded by a triple enclosure; the wire fence, then the hedge of thorny locusts, then the mulberry hedge which kept out the hot winds of summer and held fast to the protecting snows of winter.
Delaford is a nice place, I can tell you; exactly what I call a nice old fashioned place, full of comforts and conveniences; quite shut in with great garden walls that are covered with the best fruit-trees in the country; and such a mulberry tree in one corner
The trappings of the mare were of the field and jineta fashion, and of mulberry colour and green.