multeity

multeity

(mʌlˈtiːɪtɪ)
n
manifoldness
[C19: from Latin multus many, perhaps formed by analogy with haecceity]
References in periodicals archive ?
(64) Describing The Prelude as "a sustained, vacillating, yet ultimately decisive revision of Coleridge's influence," (65) Fry insists that "ontic sameness," rather than organic wholeness (Coleridge's "multeity in unity"), is the bedrock of Wordsworth's poetry.
Literary and Rhetorical Genre Epic Dramatic Work Song Play Reader Language Author position Creative Dictation Creation process Trope Metaphor Irony Sound scheme Alliteration Pararhyme Grouping Fall Rise Meter Tetrameter Free Divisioning Stanzaic Arranged Prolongation Extensional Fragmentary Syntactic Anaphora Symploce scheme Discourse Paratactic Dialectical Semiotic Iconic Symbolic relation Structure Repetition Network Position Initial Peripheral Figuration Opposition Multeity Contrast Difference Pattern Concentric Multidimensional Process Repetitive Static Proleptic Anticlimactic Contradictory Open Fixed Undirected IV.
It functions today as a microcosm of the sciences, with a multeity seldom found within one institution.
Swinburne's was a formalism characterized by four essential elements: a Coleridgean search for "unity in multeity" to be discerned in the hidden laws through which texts operated, (4) as well as the myths that underlay them; a simultaneous understanding, expressed in tropes of waves and of music, that poetic form manifested itself in time, as a process or "gathering" rather than a static product; a conviction, contrary to the aestheticism for which he is best known, that forms were invested with politically subversive potential; and, finally, an impulse toward impressionism that caused him to mingle his "disinterested" assessments of literature with exuberant pastiches that capture his own (often rapt) experiences of reading.
(29) Booth argues that the 'centripetal' force 'provides us with the best experience we have of what Coleridge called "multeity in unity", a unity that does justice to variety.
Smith sees the multeity of contemporary art as a reflection of this world of temporalities but also, and more profoundly, as a rumination on what it means to live in a globalized, postcolonial constellation that has moved beyond traditional divisions of era or epoch, modernism or postmodernism.
(10) The term sobornost' is defined as "a whole comprising interparticipatory, independent, but organically interrelated parts [...] 'multiplicity-in-unity' [...] similar to general romantic notions of the relationship of unity in multeity [...]" (Kornblatt and Gustafson 20).
I propose that we celebrate this very multeity as our curious, multiform strength, its amplitude reinforcing and invigorating our work.
"And again it's an awareness of process as much as it is a "multeity in unity "which Coleridge called beauty You're teaching a class this semester on "Science and Poetry," and I'm wondering how you explore this relationship in your teaching as well as in your writing.
And Contarini was a great sixteenth-century promulgator of this ideal, seeing a blend of government by "one, or a few, or a whole multitude" as the way to keep a "multeity in unity," as it were:
Even here Coleridge makes little attempt to excuse his francophobia, and to the modern reader his most important notions, such as the imagination, unity in multeity, and the clerisy, possess a monumental force when conveyed in Wordsworthian or neo-Kantian terms but seem oddly fragile when raised on the backs of paltry French alternatives.
As a poet who has "prized / multeity and difference down to the mold under the leaf" (S 123), Ammons hopes to accommodate all that the eye can see.