multivarious

multivarious

(ˌmʌltɪˈvɛərɪəs)
adj
having a varied or diverse qualityhaving several various forms
References in periodicals archive ?
By applying this theory of the paper stage to these often-overlooked texts, Willie shows how these works range from blunt, partisan screeds to vexed, multivarious treatments of current events.
The country is fraught with multivarious problems of a crucial and intricate nature, but ethnicity has emerged as the most significant and delicate issue (Majeed 2010: 54).
We feel the non-Moro indigenous peoples and women need more seats to represent the multivarious concerns, she explained.
and the elusive Rene Griffiths, it appears there's no end to the weird and wonderful characters lurking in the multivarious branches of his colourful family tree.
DNA is life's master molecule, the record of evolution, the stuff of genes that code for life's multivarious designs.
If we're capable of tailoring content to format and context, need that multivarious production be unified, by concept or sensibility, as was Warhol's in his day?
The Taylors have also found a useful method for organizing an astonishingly large and multivarious body of material.
This interpretation begins to move well beyond reading the stories on their own to reading them in relation to each other--something to be gained, I would suggest, in answer to Paul Smith's opening questions, by regarding In Our Time not as a collection of individual stories, or as a short story cycle, or even as a "novel" (however experimental) but as an anatomy specifically and self-consciously critiquing the multivarious and generically complicated structures that, in reality, have led to the horrible denouement of our actual "time".
More than ever in my life I had been talking in the multivarious shadings of human life in the American landscape.
The rise in female age at marriage is caused by multivarious factors, such as a greater pervasiveness of pre-nuptial employment amongst young women.
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