multivolume


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multivolume

(ˈmʌltɪˌvɒljuːm)
adj
1. (Journalism & Publishing) (of a text) comprising two or more volumes
2. (Computer Science) (of a computer disk or cartridge) containing several entities that can be accessed independently
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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"Considering that the 83-year-old averages a book a decade, his fans might wonder whether Working will reset the clock that started in 2012, when the fourth book of his multivolume magnum opus, The Years of Lyndon Johnson, was published," said Jennifer Szalai in a review published in The New York Times.
Part of a multivolume history of armies in the Second World War, this book offers an up-to-date treatment of the Red Army from an operational, economic, and political standpoint.
Rather than direct me to serious scholarship on the Rothschilds, like historian Niall Ferguson's multivolume history on the family, Amazon first recommended blatantly bigoted content.
"Harry Potter" was among the multivolume series that counted as a single entry.
In fact, a multivolume authentic dictionary of Urdu can hardly be named that has not been criticised for one shortcoming or the other.
He is also the editor of the journal American Literary Realism and currently at work on a multivolume biography of Twain.
Until some ambitious scholar produces a truly comprehensive, multivolume history of DARPA, Weinberger's book will suffice.
Otley Beyer, and arranged and bound the term papers of his students into a multivolume resource he named the 'Pasig Papers.'
With so much written on Washington, including three multivolume collections of his writings, it would be hard to imagine something new to say about him.
The first publication in a multivolume series on the history of the acquisition of major weapon systems by the Department of Defense, author Elliott Converse presents a meticulously researched overview of changes in acquisition policies, organizations, and processes within the United States military establishment during the decade and a half following World War II.
Donald Knuth, also 78, is a professor emeritus at Stanford University and the author of the influential multivolume The Art of Computer Programming.