munitionette


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munitionette

(mjuːˌnɪʃəˈnɛt)
n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) informal Brit a female munitions-factory worker, esp during the First World War
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Within minutes of setting up our stall, a lovely couple spoke with us and showed us photographs of their grandmother who had been a munitionette."
Munitionette Dorothy Mary Watson (1899 - July 31, 1917) was remembered at Swansea beach.
Gibbs said: "The first munitionette side started at William Beardsmore's factory at Parkhead in 1916.
Let the children get involved and dress up in the museum's munitionette costumes ?
Instead, a popular painting showed a 'munitionette' in feminine dress, with sweet cuds flowing from a neat bonnet, cuddling a shell as if it was a baby.
The female Maritime out-migrant in Boston, the middle-class temperance worker, the working-class munitionette, and the immigrant domestic from the British Isles are just a few of the familiar-although still obscurehistorical figures given life in this group of stories.
Visitors will be able to "meet a munitionette" and learn all about a 700,000-strong female army who supported the war effort.
Lizzie, of Stainton Street, South Shields, worked as a munitionette and also played for a ladies' football team.
"The Munitionettes Cup competition was set up to find the best womens' team from across the whole of the North East.
The football team, using a variety of names including Blyth United Munitions Ladies, Blyth Spartans Ladies and Blyth Spartans Munitionettes, was formed in August 1917 by women working as dockers and munitions workers at the South Docks in Blyth.
Her skill helped the team to become one of the best in the region, winning the coveted Munitionettes' Cup - officially called the Alfred Wood Munition Girls Challenge Cup.