muntin


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mun·tin

 (mŭn′tən)
n.
1. A strip of wood or metal separating and holding panes of glass in a window.
2. A vertical framing member set between two rails in a door or in paneling.

[Middle English mountaunt, upright post or stud, from Old French montant, from present participle of monter, to mount; see mount1.]

muntin

(ˈmʌntɪn)
n
(Building) another name (esp US) for glazing-bar
[C17: variant of C15 mountant, from Old French montant, present participle of monter to mount1]

mun•tin

(ˈmʌn tn)

n.
a bar for holding the edges of window panes within a sash.
[1300–50; earlier mountan, montan, Middle English mountaun, mountain < Middle French montant, n. use of present participle of monter to mount1]
References in periodicals archive ?
Often down the middle of a door, you'll also have a length of wood called a 'muntin'.
Overseas, Table Mountain in South Africa will become "Tle Muntin" and Bondi Beach in Australia will also adapt its name as the letters of the main blood groups disappear.
The tested skylight consisted of two horizontal divisions separated by a vertical muntin, each glazed with a single piece of glass.
Rooms include floor-to-ceiling muntin windows, wood cladding, and mid-century detailing--a design that takes cues from, as Standefer says, "a gentleman's closet for pre-Mad Men Mad Men." Here, too, the masculine, polished, and timeless theme is evident.
While the glue is setting, cut the muntin strips and glue them to the face of the panel (Photo 7).
Different window sizing, grouping, and muntin patterns have a smaller but noticeable effect.
Muntin bars (grilles) are bonded to the insulating glass, re-creating the charm of multiple panes.
These windows feature between-the-glass blinds, shades and muntin bars or custom-designed, stained glass overlays neatly tucked between panes of glass away from dust, damage and little hands.
Except for the slightest structural reinforcement, the glass was undivided: there were few things as architecturally unfashionable in 1965 as a muntin bar on a window.
One piece of glass is bent to reach from the top of the frame to the bottom without any crossbar or muntin to interfere with the view or hinder sunlight from streaming through the glass.
Workers hand assemble the muntin bars on circle head and divided light windows.