murmuration

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murmuration

(ˌmɜːməˈreɪʃən)
n
(Zoology) a collective term for starlings

Murmuration

 of starlings: a flock—Lydgate, 1470.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.murmuration - a low continuous indistinct sound; often accompanied by movement of the lips without the production of articulate speech
sound - the sudden occurrence of an audible event; "the sound awakened them"
References in periodicals archive ?
Lydia Tague, visitor experience officer at RSPB Saltholme, said: "You might have seen the spectacular starling murmurations on wildlife programmes on TV, but nothing beats seeing them in person.
From hundreds of thousands of migrating swans and geese to starling murmurations, otters and urban badgers, the series will examine what makes this year different from other autumns, asking how the unsettled summer has affected our wildlife.
Starlings perform incredible aerial displays called murmurations, when hundreds or thousands of birds collect at dusk.
There will also be a screening of filmmaker Christo Wallers' latest work inspired by starling murmurations.
Alongside special commissions for this project from Sweden and Italy, we've teamed up with Ty Cerdd to commission Murmurations by Mark D Boden.
In several cases, he pulls this off with aplomb, as when he deftly draws on social science, physics, video games, social media and Serena Williams to explain how murmurations (starling flocks) can fly in formation without careening into each other and how this applies to humans performing collective movements.
Summary: Starlings have returned to Israel forming rare murmurations in the skies.
But they are also special and engaging birds and their murmurations when they gather in the sky in flocks of up to a million before coming down to roost are one of the UK's most spectacular wildlife displays.
intricate beasts Cursed the starlings' murmurations Cursed is the
As well as being garden favourites, starlings are also famous for their amazing winter displays, known as murmurations.
The RSPB also warned that the numbers seen in the murmurations, when the birds gather above roost sites at dusk and fly in patterns before settling down for the night, are also dropping.
Like the motion of schools of fish or murmurations of starlings, these forms show the connection between organic and inorganic natural systems, no matter how dissimilar.