muscadin


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muscadin

(myskadɛ̃)
n
(Historical Terms) a dandy or fop, esp in Paris during the time of the French revolution
References in periodicals archive ?
A primera vista crei que el debutador seria algun Muscadin Parisien, que nos queria introducir este galicismo: pero hagase cargo de mi sorpresa al ver la firma con un apellido castellanisimo.
(2003) determined the phenolic contents and antioxidant capacities of 10 muscadin grapes (five bronze and five purple skin) grown in Georgia.
WORCESTER: 4.55 Cush Jewel (D Fenton to J O'Shea); Impero (R Armson to W Clay); Millys Filly (O Sherwood to Kay Marks); Muscadin (A Whillans to M Gingell).
Muscadin (5.20), pulled up when hot favourite on his debut at Musselburgh last season, is expected to atone for that costly defeat.
Sin embargo, y al menos para mayoria de los lectores, es probable que la aclaracion de los significados resulte frecuentemente necesaria; es lo que sucede con terminos como espolique (187), muscadin (191) o mirla (206).
At the height of Robespierre's Terror in 1793-1794, they roamed the Paris streets, clashing with muscadins, foppishly dressed youths who were not aristocrats but shopkeepers disgusted by the Terror.
A royalist group formed called the Muscadins, who showed their allegiance by wearing heavily musked scents: they sported hair that was short at the back, a la victime.
Nor is the currutaco simply a Spanish version of the muscadins or jeunesse doree of the Thermidorian reaction.
Soon after, he moved onto the south of France to Les Muscadins where the hectic pace he was accustomed to came to a screeching halt.
Lepeletier had been avenged by the death of Louis XVI, Marat by the execution of the Girondins; Gasparin would be avenged when all the rebels, all the muscadins, all the English and Spanish within Toulon hide their shame in the depths of the sea, or fall crushed beneath the patriots?
James Cookson is also careful to explain in brackets any expression which might be unfamiliar to an English-speaking reader of Francois Gendron's detailed study of Parisian life after Thermidor, and which - again based on police records - provides another intimate view of life in the streets, as the outrageously-dressed muscadins or shock troops of the bourgeois reaction were used to stamp out the power of the sans-culottes.